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A Dozen Reasons for Raising Gasoline Taxes


  • Wachs, Martin


Motor fuel taxes at state and federal levels have traditionally been earmarked for transportation investments, supporting road construction, maintenance, and operations, and increasingly public transit. Recently, elected officials have been reluctant to raise fuel taxes despite increases in the cost of transportation programs. Other forms of support, especially borrowing and local sales taxes are playing larger roles in transportation finance. Raising fuel taxes would be more effective, efficient and equitable than the alternatives that are increasingly more popular.

Suggested Citation

  • Wachs, Martin, 2003. "A Dozen Reasons for Raising Gasoline Taxes," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt2000f8t0, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:itsrrp:qt2000f8t0

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ian W. H. Parry & Kenneth A. Small, 2005. "Does Britain or the United States Have the Right Gasoline Tax?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1276-1289, September.
    2. Brown, Jeffrey, 2001. "Reconsider the Gas Tax: Paying for What You Get," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0zr8c2c0, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Victor R. Fuchs & Alan B. Krueger & James M. Poterba, 1997. "Why do Economists Disagree About Policy?," NBER Working Papers 6151, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dill, Jennifer & Goldman, Todd & Wachs, Martin, 1999. "California Vehicle License Fees: Incidence and Equity," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1pc436nq, University of California Transportation Center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hsu, Shi-Ling & Walters, Joshua & Purgas, Anthony, 2008. "Pollution tax heuristics: An empirical study of willingness to pay higher gasoline taxes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3612-3619, September.
    2. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Maconi, Laura & Shirvani, Tara & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part I: Externalities and economic policies in road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 2-45.
    3. repec:pal:jmarka:v:5:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1057_s41270-017-0025-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Sun, Zhentian & Li, Xuhong & Xie, Yuanchang, 2014. "A comparison of innovative financing and general fiscal investment strategies for second-class highways: Perspectives for building a sustainable financing strategy," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 193-201.

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