IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cav/cavwpp/wp151.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Poverty and Informal Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Andes Chivangue
  • Carlos Barros

Abstract

This paper analyses poverty reduction though informal trade in Mozambique, using questionnaire data and a logit model. The Mozambique economy is dominated by informal trade. Informal trade is an alternative to inexistent formal jobs and represents a strategy for escaping poverty. Results indicate that informal traders adopt this strategy as an alternative to formal jobs, and that there is an awareness that this strategy is adopted as a means of evading poverty. Other covariates enable the clarification of this relationship in the context of the theoretical background. Policy implications are derived.

Suggested Citation

  • Andes Chivangue & Carlos Barros, 2017. "Poverty and Informal Trade," CEsA Working Papers 151, CEsA - Centre for African and Development Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:cav:cavwpp:wp151
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://cesa.rc.iseg.ulisboa.pt/RePEc/cav/cavwpp/wp151.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Channing Arndt & Andres Garcia & Finn Tarp & James Thurlow, 2012. "Poverty Reduction and Economic Structure: Comparative Path Analysis for Mozambique and Vietnam," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 58(4), pages 742-763, December.
    2. Cunguara, Benedito & Hanlon, Joseph, 2010. "Poverty is not being reduced in Mozambique," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28467, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Arne Risa Hole, 2007. "Fitting mixed logit models by using maximum simulated likelihood," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(3), pages 388-401, September.
    4. Samuel J. Spiegel, 2012. "Microfinance services, poverty and artisanal mineworkers in Africa: In search of measures for empowering vulnerable groups," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 485-517, May.
    5. Mahendra Reddy, 2007. "Modelling Poverty Dimensions of Urban Informal Sector Operators in a Developing Economy," The European Journal of Development Research, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 459-479.
    6. Channing Arndt & M. Azhar Hussain & E. Samuel Jones & Virgulino Nhate & Finn Tarp & James Thurlow, 2011. "Explaining Poverty Evolution: The Case of Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 017, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Siikamaki, Juha & Layton, David F., 2001. "Logit Models For Pooled Contingent Valuation And Contingent Rating And Ranking Data: Valuing Benefits From Forest Biodiversity Conservation," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20616, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. Marcus H Böhme & Rainer Thiele, 2014. "Informal–Formal Linkages and Informal Enterprise Performance in Urban West Africa," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(4), pages 473-489, September.
    9. David Hensher & William Greene, 2003. "The Mixed Logit model: The state of practice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 133-176, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Carlos Barros, 2012. "Sustainable Tourism in Inhambane-Mozambique," CEsA Working Papers 105, CEsA - Centre for African and Development Studies.
    2. Sagebiel, Julian & Glenk, Klaus & Meyerhoff, Jürgen, 2017. "Spatially explicit demand for afforestation," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 190-199.
    3. Achtnicht Martin & Osberghaus Daniel, 2019. "The Demand for Index-Based Flood Insurance in a High-Income Country," German Economic Review, De Gruyter, vol. 20(2), pages 217-242, May.
    4. Anastassiadis, Friederike & Liebe, Ulf & Mußhoff, Oliver, 2015. "Financial Flexibility in agricultural investment decisions: A discrete choice experiment," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 16(1), pages 1-12.
    5. Feil, J.-H. & Anastassiadis, F. & Mußhoff, O. & Schilling, P., 2015. "Analysing Farmers’ Use of Price Hedging Instruments: An Experimental Approach," Proceedings “Schriften der Gesellschaft für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften des Landbaues e.V.”, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA), vol. 50, March.
    6. David Rudoler & Raisa Deber & Janet Barnsley & Richard H. Glazier & Adrian Rohit Dass & Audrey Laporte, 2015. "Paying for Primary Care: The Factors Associated with Physician Self‐selection into Payment Models," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1229-1242, September.
    7. Chalak, Ali & Al-Naghi, Hani & Irani, Alexandra & Abou-Zeid, Maya, 2016. "Commuters’ behavior towards upgraded bus services in Greater Beirut: Implications for greenhouse gas emissions, social welfare and transport policy," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 265-285.
    8. Jiang, Shan & Gu, Yuanyuan & Yang, Fan & Wu, Tao & Wang, Hui & Cutler, Henry & Zhang, Lufa, 2020. "Tertiary hospitals or community clinics? An enquiry into the factors affecting patients' choice for healthcare facilities in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    9. Jan Vanstockem & Liesbet Vranken & Brent Bleys & Ben Somers & Martin Hermy, 2018. "Do Looks Matter? A Case Study on Extensive Green Roofs Using Discrete Choice Experiments," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-15, January.
    10. Ajayi, V. & Reiner, D., 2020. "Consumer Willingness to Pay for Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Green Plastics," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 20110, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Galassi, Veronica & Madlener, Reinhard, 2017. "The Role of Environmental Concern and Comfort Expectations in Energy Retrofit Decisions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 53-65.
    12. Feil, J.-H. & Anastassiadis, F. & Mußhoff, O. & Kasten, P., 2016. "Analysing Farmers’ Preferences fo Collaborative Arrangements: An Experimental Approach," Proceedings “Schriften der Gesellschaft für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften des Landbaues e.V.”, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA), vol. 51, March.
    13. Haile, Kaleab K. & Tirivayi, Nyasha & Tesfaye, Wondimagegn, 2019. "Farmers’ willingness to accept payments for ecosystem services on agricultural land: The case of climate-smart agroforestry in Ethiopia," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 39(C).
    14. Wendler, Cordula & Liebe, Ulf & Ihle, Rico & von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan, 2012. "The Willingness to Pay of European Consumers for Jointly Produced Israeli – Palestinian Products," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126727, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    15. Vlaeminck, Pieter & Vranken, Liesbet & Van Den Broeck, Goedele & Vande Velde, Katrien & Raymaekers, Karen & Maertens, Miet, 2015. "Farmers’ preferences for Fair Trade contracting in Benin," Working Papers 225931, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    16. Schwirplies, Claudia & Dütschke, Elisabeth & Schleich, Joachim & Ziegler, Andreas, 2019. "The willingness to offset CO2 emissions from traveling: Findings from discrete choice experiments with different framings," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 1-1.
    17. Gutacker, Nils & Siciliani, Luigi & Moscelli, Giuseppe & Gravelle, Hugh, 2016. "Choice of hospital: Which type of quality matters?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 230-246.
    18. Paha, Johannes & Rompf, Dirk & Warnecke, Christiane, 2013. "Customer choice patterns in passenger rail competition," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 209-227.
    19. Schwirplies, Claudia & Dütschke, Elisabeth & Schleich, Joachim & Ziegler, Andreas, 2017. "Consumers' willingness to offset their CO2 emissions from traveling: A discrete choice analysis of framing and provider contributions," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S05/2017, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    20. Mulatu, Dawit W. & van der Veen, Anne & van Oel, Pieter R., 2014. "Farm households' preferences for collective and individual actions to improve water-related ecosystem services: The Lake Naivasha basin, Kenya," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 22-33.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cav:cavwpp:wp151. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sónia da Silva Pina). General contact details of provider: https://cesa.rc.iseg.ulisboa.pt/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.