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Poverty is not being reduced in Mozambique

Author

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  • Cunguara, Benedito
  • Hanlon, Joseph

Abstract

The paper presents a wide range of data on Mozambique and examines what this shows about changes to poverty and income levels over the past decade. The authors point to the lack of changes in farming practice which is contributing to the persistence of poverty and consider cash income and the poverty trap in Mozambique. The paper goes on to discuss the failure of donor-led development models and looks at Mozambique and other countries for alternative policies that might reduce poverty and raise agricultural production. Finally, the paper considers the arguments for and against a change of policy in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Cunguara, Benedito & Hanlon, Joseph, 2010. "Poverty is not being reduced in Mozambique," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28467, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:28467
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/28467/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gilbert,Christopher L. & Vines,David (ed.), 2000. "The World Bank," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521790956, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alfani, Federica & Azzarri, Carlo & d'Errico, Marco & Molini, Vasco, 2012. "Poverty in Mozambique : new evidence from recent household surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6217, The World Bank.
    2. Andes Chivangue & Carlos Barros, 2017. "Poverty and Informal Trade," CEsA Working Papers 151, CEsA - Center for African, Asian and Latin American Studies.
    3. Cecilia Navarra, 2017. "Contracts between smallholders and private firms in Mozambique and their implications on food security," WIDER Working Paper Series 197, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Corene Matyas & Julie Silva, 2013. "Extreme weather and economic well-being in rural Mozambique," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 66(1), pages 31-49, March.
    5. Massingarela, Cláudio & Nhate, Virgulino & Salvucci, Vincenzo, 2013. "The Political Economy of Food Price Policy: Country Case Study of Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 037, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Julie A. Silva, 2013. "Rural Income Inequality in Mozambique: National Dynamics and Local Experiences?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 23-50, Summer.
    7. Maia Green, 2012. "Co-producing ineffective states: social knowledge, social policy and social citizenship in Africa and in development," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-014-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    8. Giesbert, Lena & Schindler, Kati, 2012. "Assets, Shocks, and Poverty Traps in Rural Mozambique," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1594-1609.
    9. Cunguara, Benedito & Darnhofer, Ika, 2011. "Assessing the impact of improved agricultural technologies on household income in rural Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 378-390, June.
    10. Cecilia Navarra, 2018. "Contract farming in Mozambique. Implications on gender inequalities within and across rural households," WIDER Working Paper Series 026, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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