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Structural Modelling of Female Labour Participation and Occupation Decisions

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  • De Hoyos, R.E.

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to estimate the parameters defining female labour participation and occupation decisions. Departing from a theoretical framework, we use micro data to estimate the wage-participation elasticity in Mexico. Consistency between the selectivity-adjusted wages and the multinomial participation equations is achieved via a two-step estimation procedure following Lee (1984). We use the results of our model to test and quantify three hypotheses explaining recent increases in female labour participation in Mexico. Our results show that the observed 12 per cent increase in female labour participation in Mexico between 1994 and 2000 is explained by the combination of a negative income shock caused by the 1994-95 Peso crisis, the increase in expected wages taking place in the manufacturing sector during the post-NAFTA period and a reduction in the female reservation wage.

Suggested Citation

  • De Hoyos, R.E., 2006. "Structural Modelling of Female Labour Participation and Occupation Decisions," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0611, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0611
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    1. Gong, Xiaodong & Van Soest, Arthur & Villagomez, Elizabeth, 2004. "Mobility in the Urban Labor Market: A Panel Data Analysis for Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 1-36, October.
    2. Dubin, Jeffrey A & McFadden, Daniel L, 1984. "An Econometric Analysis of Residential Electric Appliance Holdings and Consumption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 345-362, March.
    3. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-512, March.
    4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    5. Heckman, James J, 1993. "What Has Been Learned about Labor Supply in the Past Twenty Years?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 116-121, May.
    6. Heckman, James J & Honore, Bo E, 1990. "The Empirical Content of the Roy Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1121-1149, September.
    7. R. E. De Hoyos, 2005. "SVYSELMLOG: Stata module to compute selectivity adjustment based on the multinomial logit for survey design," Statistical Software Components S454901, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 21 Sep 2005.
    8. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 679-694, July.
    9. Marcouiller, Douglas & Ruiz de Castilla, Veronica & Woodruff, Christopher, 1997. "Formal Measures of the Informal-Sector Wage Gap in Mexico, El Salvador, and Peru," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 367-392, January.
    10. A. D. Roy, 1951. "Some Thoughts On The Distribution Of Earnings," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 135-146.
    11. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-318, May.
    12. McFadden, Daniel, 1974. "The measurement of urban travel demand," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 303-328, November.
    13. De Hoyos, Rafael E., 2005. "The Microeconomics of Inequality, Poverty and Market Liberalizing Reforms," WIDER Working Paper Series 063, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Maloney, William F, 1999. "Does Informality Imply Segmentation in Urban Labor Markets? Evidence from Sectoral Transitions in Mexico," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 275-302, May.
    15. Heckman, James J & Sedlacek, Guilherme, 1985. "Heterogeneity, Aggregation, and Market Wage Functions: An Empirical Model of Self-selection in the Labor Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(6), pages 1077-1125, December.
    16. Deaton,Angus & Muellbauer,John, 1980. "Economics and Consumer Behavior," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521296762, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Claudio Agostini & Javiera Selman & Marcela Perticara, 2012. "Una Propuesta de Crédito Tributario al Ingreso para Chile," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv282, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    2. Claudio A., Agostini & Javiera, Selman & Marcela, Perticará, 2013. "Una propuesta de crédito tributario al ingreso para Chile," Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(129), pages 49-104.
    3. Chung, Anna, 2008. "The Effects of For-Profit College Training on Earnings," MPRA Paper 18972, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2009.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Participation; wage differentials; microsimulation; Mexico;

    JEL classification:

    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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