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Una propuesta de crédito tributario al ingreso para Chile

Author

Listed:
  • Claudio A., Agostini

    () (Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago)

  • Javiera, Selman

    () (Universidad de Chile, Santiago. Facultad de Economía Y Negocios)

  • Marcela, Perticará

    () (Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Santiago. Facultad de Economía y Negocios)

Abstract

In recent decades, we have seen in Latin America an increase in the use of conditional cash transfer programs to fight poverty. Although these programs can be effective to improve the welfare of the poor in the short term and to guarantee a certain basic health care and education, they can also discourage employment, thus creating a poverty trap and a dependence on the social welfare system. In other regions of the world, the tax system has been used not only to redistribute income, but also to implement social policies. A good example is the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) in the United States, which offers to lower-income individuals a reimbursable credit conditioned on working. This policy has simultaneously increased employment, reduced inequality and reduced poverty particularly among single mothers. This paper estimates, through simulation, the effect that a system like the EITC would have in Chile. The results show that a tax credit could increase employment and at the same time reduce poverty and inequality. Additionally, a comparison of the results to a simulation of the Ethical Family Income Program allows concluding that the EITC is more effective in increasing the income of individuals below the poverty line and it has a lower transfer cost per family.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudio A., Agostini & Javiera, Selman & Marcela, Perticará, 2013. "Una propuesta de crédito tributario al ingreso para Chile," Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(129), pages 49-104.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpt:journl:v::y:2013:i:129:p:49-104
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    Cited by:

    1. Claudio, Sapelli, 2014. "Desigualdad, movilidad, pobreza: necesidad de una política diferente," Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(134), pages 59-84.
    2. Andrés Hernando & Estéfano Rubio, 2015. "Aporte solidario al ingreso de trabajo (ASIT): una mejor alternativa contra la desigualdad," Puntos de Referencia 419, Centro de Estudios Públicos.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    EITC; poverty; inequality; ethical family income; Chile;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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