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The shortage of medical workers in Sub-Saharan Africa and substitution policy

Author

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  • Bourgain, Arnaud

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

  • Pieretti, Patrice

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

  • Zou, Benteng

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

Abstract

Substitution policies are strategies sometimes chosen in Sub-Saharan Africa for curtailing the shortage of health professionals especially caused by the outflow of medical personnel. The aim of our contribution is to propose a way to assess the merits and drawbacks of substitution policies by developing a simple growth model of healthcare productivity with medical brain drain. Within this framework, we use a medical care production function of the CES type which aggregates low and high specialized health workers. We then run simulations which compare scenarios with and without substitution strategies by using data from the Ghana's medical sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Bourgain, Arnaud & Pieretti, Patrice & Zou, Benteng, 2011. "The shortage of medical workers in Sub-Saharan Africa and substitution policy," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 407, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bie:wpaper:407
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A brain gain with a brain drain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 227-234, August.
    2. Pieretti, Patrice & Zou, Benteng, 2009. "Brain drain and factor complementarity," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 404-413, March.
    3. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:6:y:2007:i:35:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1998. "Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing or a "curse"?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 363-367, September.
    5. Alan Maynard, 2006. "Medical Workforce Planning: Some Forecasting Challenges," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 39(3), pages 323-329, September.
    6. Benteng ZOU & Patrice Pieretti, 2007. "An Extended Solow Growth Model with Emigration: Transitional Dynamics and Skills Complementarity," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(35), pages 1-11.
    7. Alok Bhargava & Frédéric Docquier, 2008. "HIV Pandemic, Medical Brain Drain, and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 345-366, May.
    8. M. H. Khalil Timamy, 2005. "Debate," Review of African Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(104-105), pages 383-393, June.
    9. Richardson, Gerald & Maynard, Alan & Cullum, Nicky & Kindig, David, 1998. "Skill mix changes: substitution or service development?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 119-132, August.
    10. Martineau, Tim & Decker, Karola & Bundred, Peter, 2004. ""Brain drain" of health professionals: from rhetoric to responsible action," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 1-10, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Driouchi, Ahmed, 2014. "Evidence and Prospects of Shortage and Mobility of Medical Doctors: A Literature Survey," MPRA Paper 59322, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Substitution policy; Medical shortage; Healthcare policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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