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"Brain drain" of health professionals: from rhetoric to responsible action

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  • Martineau, Tim
  • Decker, Karola
  • Bundred, Peter

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  • Martineau, Tim & Decker, Karola & Bundred, Peter, 2004. ""Brain drain" of health professionals: from rhetoric to responsible action," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 1-10, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:70:y:2004:i:1:p:1-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jinks, Clare & Ong, Bie Nio & Paton, Calum, 2000. "Mobile medics? The mobility of doctors in the European Economic Area," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 45-64, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fassin, Didier, 2008. "The elementary forms of care: An empirical approach to ethics in a South African Hospital," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 262-270, July.
    2. Robin Gauld & Simon Horsburgh, 2016. "Does a host country capture knowledge of migrant doctors and how might it? A study of UK doctors in New Zealand," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 1-8, January.
    3. Rachel Jenkins & Robert Kydd & Paul Mullen & Kenneth Thomson & James Sculley & Susan Kuper & Joanna Carroll & Oye Gureje & Simon Hatcher & Sharon Brownie & Christopher Carroll & Sheila Hollins & Mai L, 2010. "International Migration of Doctors, and Its Impact on Availability of Psychiatrists in Low and Middle Income Countries," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 5(2), pages 1-9, February.
    4. Arnaud Bourgain & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zou, 2008. "The Shortage of Medical Workers in Sub-Saharan Africa and Substitution Policy," CREA Discussion Paper Series 08-13, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    5. Chojnicki, Xavier & Moullan, Yasser, 2018. "Is there a ‘pig cycle’ in the labour supply of doctors? How training and immigration policies respond to physician shortages," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 200(C), pages 227-237.
    6. Martineau, Tim & Willetts, Annie, 2006. "The health workforce: Managing the crisis ethical international recruitment of health professionals: will codes of practice protect developing country health systems?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 358-367, February.
    7. Hercog, Metka & Siegel, Melissa, 2011. "Promoting return and circular migration of the highly skilled," MERIT Working Papers 2011-015, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    8. Alina BOTEZAT & Andreea MORARU, 2020. "Brain drain from Romania: what do we know so far about the Romanian medical diaspora? Abstract: In recent years a considerable amount of attention has been directed to the migration of tertiary educat," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 11, pages 309-334, June.
    9. Ifanti, Amalia A. & Argyriou, Andreas A. & Kalofonou, Foteini H. & Kalofonos, Haralabos P., 2014. "Physicians’ brain drain in Greece: A perspective on the reasons why and how to address it," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 210-215.

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