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Understanding Bubbly Episodes

Author

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  • Vasco M. Carvalho
  • Alberto Martín
  • Jaume Ventura

Abstract

Over the last two decades US aggregate wealth has fluctuated substantially. Against the backdrop of the Great Recession, the effects of these boom-and-bust cycles have come to dominate academic and policy discussions. How can we explain these fluctuations in wealth? Why are these fluctuations associated with changes in consumption, investment and output? In this note, we argue that answers to these questions entail the addition of two ingredients to existent macroeconomic models: rational bubbles and financial frictions. We explain why each of these building blocks is crucial to understand recent events and how they can be seamlessly integrated in standard models.

Suggested Citation

  • Vasco M. Carvalho & Alberto Martín & Jaume Ventura, 2012. "Understanding Bubbly Episodes," Working Papers 605, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bge:wpaper:605
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alberto Martin & Jaume Ventura, 2011. "Theoretical Notes on Bubbles and the Current Crisis," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(1), pages 6-40, April.
    2. Andrew B. Abel & N. Gregory Mankiw & Lawrence H. Summers & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 1989. "Assessing Dynamic Efficiency: Theory and Evidence," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(1), pages 1-19.
    3. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-248, April.
    4. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    5. Tirole, Jean, 1985. "Asset Bubbles and Overlapping Generations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1499-1528, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:macchp:v2-1427 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alberto Martin & Jaume Ventura, 2017. "The macroeconomics of rational bubbles: a user's guide," Economics Working Papers 1581, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Takuma Kunieda & Tarishi Matsuoka & Akihisa Shibata, 2017. "Asset Bubbles, Technology Choice, and Financial Crises," Discussion Paper Series 157, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Feb 2017.
    4. Haldane, Andrew & Shanbhogue, Rachana & Attanasio, Orazio & Besley, Timothy & Lindert, Peter & Piketty, Thomas & Ventura, Jaume, 2015. "Capital in the 21st century," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(1), pages 36-46.
    5. repec:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:1:p:1-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kunieda, Takuma & Shibata, Akihisa, 2016. "Asset bubbles, economic growth, and a self-fulfilling financial crisis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 70-84.
    7. Karl Farmer, 2013. "EMU Imbalances in a Two-Country Overlapping Generations Model," EcoMod2013 5484, EcoMod.
    8. Takuma Kunieda & Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Ryonghun Im, 2017. "Asset Bubbles, Unemployment, and a Financial Crisis," Discussion Paper Series 156, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Feb 2017.
    9. Karl Farmer, 2013. "Financial Integration and EMU's External Imbalances in a Two-Country OLG Model," Graz Economics Papers 2013-07, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    10. Uribe Gil, Jorge Mario, 2013. "Testing for multiple bubbles with daily data," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO-CIDSE 011028, UNIVERSIDAD DEL VALLE - CIDSE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bubbles; dynamic inefficiency; economic growth; financial frictions; pyramid schemes;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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