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Domino Effects when Banks Hoard Liquidity: The French network

  • Fourel, V.
  • Héam, J-C.
  • Salakhova, D.
  • Tavolaro, S.

We investigate the consequences of banks' liquidity hoarding behaviour for the stability of the financial system by proposing a new model of banking contagion through two channels, bilateral exposures and funding shortage. Inspired by the key role of liquidity hoarding in the 2007-2009 financial crisis, we incorporate banks' hoarding behaviour in a standard Iterative Default Cascade algorithm to compute the propagation of a common market shock through a banking system. In addition to potential solvency contagion, a market shock leads to banks liquidity hoarding that may generate problems of short-term funding for other banks. As an empirical exercise, we apply this model to the French banking system. Relying on data on banks bilateral exposures collected by France' Prudential Supervisory Authority, the French banking sector appears resilient to the combination of an initial market shock (losses on marked-to-market assets) and the resulting solvency and liquidity contagion. Moreover, the model gauges the relative weight of the various factors in the total loss.

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Paper provided by Banque de France in its series Working papers with number 432.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:432
Contact details of provider: Postal: Banque de France 31 Rue Croix des Petits Champs LABOLOG - 49-1404 75049 PARIS
Web page: http://www.banque-france.fr/

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  1. Toivanen, Mervi, 2009. "Financial interlinkages and risk of contagion in the Finnish interbank market," Research Discussion Papers 6/2009, Bank of Finland.
  2. Larry Eisenberg & Thomas H. Noe, 2001. "Systemic Risk in Financial Systems," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(2), pages 236-249, February.
  3. Matteo Barigozzi & Giorgio Fagiolo & Diego Garlaschelli, 2009. "Multinetwork of international trade: A commodity-specific analysis," Papers 0908.1879, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2010.
  4. Christian Upper & Andreas Worms, 2001. "Estimating bilateral exposures in the German interbank market: is there a danger of contagion?," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Marrying the macro- and micro-prudential dimensions of financial stability, volume 1, pages 211-229 Bank for International Settlements.
  5. Gai, Prasanna & Kapadia, Sujit, 2010. "Contagion in financial networks," Bank of England working papers 383, Bank of England.
  6. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Risk Assessment for Banking Systems," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(9), pages 1301-1314, September.
  7. Acharya, Viral V & Skeie, David, 2011. "A Model of Liquidity Hoarding and Term Premia in Inter-Bank Markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 8705, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Using Market Information for Banking System Risk Assessment," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(1), March.
  9. International Monetary Fund, 2012. "France; Financial System Stability Assessment," IMF Staff Country Reports 12/341, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Gai, Prasanna & Haldane, Andrew & Kapadia, Sujit, 2011. "Complexity, concentration and contagion," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(5), pages 453-470.
  11. Lelyveld, Iman van & Liedorp, Franka, 2006. "Interbank Contagion in the Dutch Banking Sector: A Sensitivity Analysis," MPRA Paper 806, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. James, Christopher, 1991. " The Losses Realized in Bank Failures," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1223-42, September.
  13. Gouriéroux, Christian & Héam, Jean-Cyprien & Monfort, Alain, 2013. "Liquidation equilibrium with seniority and hidden CDO," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/14977, Paris Dauphine University.
  14. Mistrulli, Paolo Emilio, 2011. "Assessing financial contagion in the interbank market: Maximum entropy versus observed interbank lending patterns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 1114-1127, May.
  15. Gourieroux, C. & Heam, J.C. & Monfort, A., 2013. "Liquidation equilibrium with seniority and hidden CDO," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5261-5274.
  16. Gourieroux, C. & Heam, J.C. & Monfort, A., 2012. "Bilateral Exposures and Systemic Solvency Risk," Working papers 414, Banque de France.
  17. Furfine, Craig H, 2003. " Interbank Exposures: Quantifying the Risk of Contagion," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(1), pages 111-28, February.
  18. Upper, Christian, 2011. "Simulation methods to assess the danger of contagion in interbank markets," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 111-125, August.
  19. Gouriéroux, Christian & Héam, Jean-Cyprien & Monfort, Alain, 2012. "Bilateral exposures and systemic solvency risk," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/14967, Paris Dauphine University.
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