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Demanda laboral en la Banca Central: análisis de tendencias 2000-2009

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  • Freddy H. Castro
  • Ingrid Monroy

Abstract

Este documento presenta las principales tendencias en las plantas de personal, salarios y funciones de 63 bancos centrales, para el período 2000-2009. Se profundiza en el análisis de algunas funciones que realizan los bancos centrales como la supervisión del sistema financiero, la operación de los sistemas de pagos, la administración de las reservas internacionales, el desarrollo de actividades de educación económica y financiera, la elaboración de cuentas nacionales y el desarrollo de investigación económica y financiera. Se desarrolla un modelo de demanda laboral donde se explican algunos determinantes de la plantas de los bancos centrales. Los resultados señalan que en general las plantas de los bancos centrales han venido reduciendo su tamaño debido a procesos de reestructuración, como es el caso de las economías pertenecientes a la Unión Europea y de modernización de la Banca central. Se analizaron modelos de panel estático y dinámico, encontrando una estabilidad y una persistencia del tamaño de la planta en el tiempo.

Suggested Citation

  • Freddy H. Castro & Ingrid Monroy, 2011. "Demanda laboral en la Banca Central: análisis de tendencias 2000-2009," Borradores de Economia 662, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:662
    DOI: 10.32468/be.662
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demanda laboral; funciones de los bancos centrales; panel; panel dinámico.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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