IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bde/wpaper/1226.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The effectiveness of forex interventions in four Latin American countries

Author

Listed:
  • Carmen Broto

    () (Banco de España)

Abstract

Many central banks actively intervene in the foreign exchange (forex) market, although there is no consensus on its impact on the exchange rate level and volatility. We analyze the effects of daily forex interventions in four Latin American countries with inflation targets — namely, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru — by fitting GARCH-type models. These countries represent a broad span of intervention strategies in terms of size and frequency, ranging from pure discretionality to intervention rules. We also provide new evidence on the presence of asymmetries, which arise if foreign currency purchases and sales have different effects on the exchange rate. We find that first interventions, either isolated or initial in a rule, reduce exchange rate volatility, although their size plays a minor role. Our results support the signaling effect of interventions under inflation targeting regimes

Suggested Citation

  • Carmen Broto, 2012. "The effectiveness of forex interventions in four Latin American countries," Working Papers 1226, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  • Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1226
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/12/Fich/dt1226e.pdf
    File Function: First version, July 2012
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hernán Rincón & Jorge Toro, 2010. "Are Capital Controls and Central Bank Intervention Effective?," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 007622, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    2. Anna Nordstrom & Scott Roger & Mark R. Stone & Seiichi Shimizu & Turgut Kisinbay & Jorge Restrepo, 2009. "The Role of the Exchange Rate in Inflation-Targeting Emerging Economies; Targeting Emerging Economies," IMF Occasional Papers 267, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Kim, Suk-Joong & Sheen, Jeffrey, 2002. "The determinants of foreign exchange intervention by central banks: evidence from Australia," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 619-649, October.
    4. Hali Edison & Paul Cashin & Hong Liang, 2006. "Foreign exchange intervention and the Australian dollar: has it mattered?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 155-171.
    5. Eric Hillebrand & Gunther Schnabl, 2008. "A structural break in the effects of Japanese foreign exchange intervention on yen/dollar exchange rate volatility," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 389-401, December.
    6. Ghosh, Atish R. & Ostry, Jonathan D. & Chamon, Marcos, 2016. "Two targets, two instruments: Monetary and exchange rate policies in emerging market economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 172-196.
    7. Kim, Suk-Joong & Sheen, Jeffrey, 2006. "Interventions in the Yen-dollar spot market: A story of price, volatility and volume," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 3191-3214, November.
    8. Neely, Christopher J., 2008. "Central bank authorities' beliefs about foreign exchange intervention," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 1-25, February.
    9. M. Angeles Carnero & Daniel Peña & Esther Ruiz, 2007. "Effects of outliers on the identification and estimation of GARCH models," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(4), pages 471-497, July.
    10. Disyatat, Piti & Galati, Gabriele, 2007. "The effectiveness of foreign exchange intervention in emerging market countries: Evidence from the Czech koruna," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 383-402, April.
    11. Rogers, J. M. & Siklos, P. L., 2003. "Foreign exchange market intervention in two small open economies: the Canadian and Australian experience," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 393-416, June.
    12. Andrew Harvey & Esther Ruiz & Neil Shephard, 1994. "Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(2), pages 247-264.
    13. Dominguez, Kathryn M., 1998. "Central bank intervention and exchange rate volatility1," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 161-190, February.
    14. Hentschel, Ludger, 1995. "All in the family Nesting symmetric and asymmetric GARCH models," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 71-104, September.
    15. Humpage, Owen F., 2000. "The United States as an informed foreign-exchange speculator," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 10(3-4), pages 287-302, December.
    16. Frenkel, Michael & Pierdzioch, Christian & Stadtmann, Georg, 2005. "The effects of Japanese foreign exchange market interventions on the yen/U.S. dollar exchange rate volatility," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 27-39.
    17. Hoshikawa, Takeshi, 2008. "The effect of intervention frequency on the foreign exchange market: The Japanese experience," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 547-559, June.
    18. Berganza, Juan Carlos & Broto, Carmen, 2012. "Flexible inflation targets, forex interventions and exchange rate volatility in emerging countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 428-444.
    19. Gustavo Adler & Camilo E Tovar Mora, 2011. "Foreign Exchange Intervention; A Shield Against Appreciation Winds?," IMF Working Papers 11/165, International Monetary Fund.
    20. Alberto Humala & Gabriel Rodriguez, 2010. "Foreign exchange intervention and exchange rate volatility in Peru," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(15), pages 1485-1491.
    21. Christopher J. Neely, 2001. "The practice of central bank intervention: looking under the hood," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 1-10.
    22. Reitz, Stefan & Taylor, Mark P., 2008. "The coordination channel of foreign exchange intervention: A nonlinear microstructural analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 55-76, January.
    23. Dominguez, Kathryn Mary, 1990. "Market responses to coordinated central bank intervention," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 121-163, January.
    24. Edison, H.J., 1993. "The Effectiveness of Central-Bank Intervention: A Survey of the Litterature after 1982," Princeton Studies in International Economics 18, International Economics Section, Departement of Economics Princeton University,.
    25. Domac, Ilker & Mendoza, Alfonso, 2004. "Is there room for foreign exchange interventions under an inflation targeting framework ? Evidence from Mexico and Turkey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3288, The World Bank.
    26. Kim, Suk-Joong & Pham, Cyril Minh Dao, 2006. "Is foreign exchange intervention by central banks bad news for debt markets?: A case of Reserve Bank of Australia's interventions 1986-2003," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 446-467, December.
    27. Christopher J. Neely, 2005. "An analysis of recent studies of the effect of foreign exchange intervention," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 685-718.
    28. Kim, Suk-Joong & Kortian, Tro & Sheen, Jeffrey, 2000. "Central bank intervention and exchange rate volatility -- Australian evidence," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 10(3-4), pages 381-405, December.
    29. Dominguez, Kathryn M.E., 2006. "When do central bank interventions influence intra-daily and longer-term exchange rate movements?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(7), pages 1051-1071, November.
    30. Mark P. Taylor & Lucio Sarno, 2001. "Official Intervention in the Foreign Exchange Market: Is It Effective and, If So, How Does It Work?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 839-868, September.
    31. Beine, Michel & Janssen, Gust & Lecourt, Christelle, 2009. "Should central bankers talk to the foreign exchange markets?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 776-803, September.
    32. Watanabe, Toshiaki & Harada, Kimie, 2006. "Effects of the Bank of Japan's intervention on yen/dollar exchange rate volatility," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 99-111, March.
    33. Baillie, Richard T. & Osterberg, William P., 1997. "Why do central banks intervene?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 909-919, December.
    34. Hsieh, David A, 1989. "Modeling Heteroscedasticity in Daily Foreign-Exchange Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 7(3), pages 307-317, July.
    35. McKenzie, Michael, 2002. "The Economics of Exchange Rate Volatility Asymmetry," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(3), pages 247-260, July.
    36. Herman Kamil, 2008. "Is Central Bank Intervention Effective Under Inflation Targeting Regimes? The Case of Colombia," IMF Working Papers 08/88, International Monetary Fund.
    37. Priscilla Chiu, 2003. "Transparency versus constructive ambiguity in foreign exchange intervention," BIS Working Papers 144, Bank for International Settlements.
    38. Dominguez, Kathryn M & Frankel, Jeffrey A, 1993. "Does Foreign-Exchange Intervention Matter? The Portfolio Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1356-1369, December.
    39. Christelle Lecourt & Helene Raymond, 2006. "Central bank interventions in industrialized countries: a characterization based on survey results," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 123-138.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Erick Lahura & Marco Vega, 2013. "Asymmetric effects of FOREX intervention using intraday data: evidence from Peru," BIS Working Papers 430, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. repec:wsi:qjfxxx:v:04:y:2014:i:01:n:s2010139214500025 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Melesse Tashu, 2014. "Motives and Effectiveness of Forex Interventions; Evidence from Peru," IMF Working Papers 14/217, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Rossini, Renzo & Quispe, Zenón & Serrano, Enrique, 2014. "Intervención cambiaria en el Perú: 2007 a 2013," Revista Estudios Económicos, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú, issue 27, pages 9-24.
    5. X. Fernández, Bernardo & Fernández Q., Vladimir & Aldazosa, E. Rene, 2017. "Una Subasta Doble de Divisas para la Determinación del Tipo de Cambio en Bolivia," Documentos de trabajo 4/2017, Instituto de Investigaciones Socio-Económicas (IISEC), Universidad Católica Boliviana.
    6. Santiago García-Verdú & Miguel Zerecero, 2013. "On central bank interventions in the Mexican peso/dollar foreign exchange market," BIS Working Papers 429, Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Pablo Pincheira, 2013. "Interventions and inflation expectations in an inflation targeting economy," BIS Working Papers 427, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. repec:mtp:titles:0262037165 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:eee:riibaf:v:45:y:2018:i:c:p:271-284 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Renzo Rossini & Zenon Quispe & Enrique Serrano, 2013. "Foreign exchange intervention in Peru," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Sovereign risk: a world without risk-free assets?, volume 73, pages 243-262 Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Santiago García-Verdú & Manuel Ramos-Francia, 2014. "Interventions and Expected Exchange Rates in Emerging Market Economies," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(01), pages 1-34.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange rate volatility; Foreign exchange interventions; GARCH;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • C54 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Quantitative Policy Modeling

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1226. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (María Beiro. Electronic Dissemination of Information Unit. Research Department. Banco de España). General contact details of provider: http://www.bde.es/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.