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Foreign exchange intervention and exchange rate volatility in Peru

  • Alberto Humala
  • Gabriel Rodriguez

Flexible exchange rate experience in Peru has been accompanied by frequent official interventions in the form of foreign exchange purchases or sales. Monetary authority pursues reducing excess volatility in the exchange rate through its direct intervention. However, in recent years, this intervention has concentrated on US dollar purchases, apparently signalling a bias towards defending a given exchange rate level (not necessarily fixed). For the period 1994 to 2007, this document assesses consistency of the empirical evidence with the goal of reducing exchange rate volatility. Thus, it uses univariate and multivariate time series models subject to stochastic shifts to study currency pressures. Results suggest consistency with the reduced-volatility goal. Nonetheless, in line with other studies, factors such as the foreign exchange gap with respect to its trend also induce foreign exchange intervention.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 17 (2010)
Issue (Month): 15 ()
Pages: 1485-1491

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:15:p:1485-1491
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  1. Rasmus Fatum & Michael M. Hutchison, . "Is Sterilized Foreign Exchange Intervention Effective After All? An Event Study Approach," EPRU Working Paper Series 99-09, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  2. Michel Beine & Sébastien Laurent & Christelle Lecourt, 2003. "Official central bank interventions and exchange rate volatility: evidence from a regime-switching analysis," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10437, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Mark P. Taylor, 2004. "Is Official Exchange Rate Intervention Effective?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71, pages 1-11, 02.
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  6. Herman Kamil, 2008. "Is Central Bank Intervention Effective Under Inflation Targeting Regimes? the Case of Colombia," IMF Working Papers 08/88, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Brunetti, Celso & Scotti, Chiara & Mariano, Roberto S. & Tan, Augustine H.H., 2008. "Markov switching GARCH models of currency turmoil in Southeast Asia," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 104-128, June.
  8. Luis Carranza & Juan M. Cayo & José E. Galdón-Sánchez, 2003. "Exchange Rate Volatility and Economic Performance in Peru: A Firm Level Analysis," Faculty Working Papers 12/03, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
  9. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear Of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408, May.
  10. Hoshikawa, Takeshi, 2008. "The effect of intervention frequency on the foreign exchange market: The Japanese experience," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 547-559, June.
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