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Volatility transmission across markets: a Multichain Markov Switching model

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  • Giampiero M. Gallo
  • Edoardo Otranto

Abstract

The integration of financial markets across countries has modified the way prices react to news. Innovations originating in one market diffuse to other markets following patterns which usually stress the presence of interdependence. In some cases, though, covariances across markets have an asymmetric component which reflects the dominance of one over the others. The volatility transmission mechanisms in such events may be more complex than what can be modelled as a multivariate GARCH model. In this article, we adopt a new Markov Switching approach and we suppose that periods of high volatility and periods of low volatility represent the states of an ergodic Markov Chain where the transition probability is made dependent on the state of the 'dominant' series. We provide some theoretical background, and illustrate the model on Asian markets data showing support for the idea of dominant market and the good prediction performance of the model on a multi-period horizon.

Suggested Citation

  • Giampiero M. Gallo & Edoardo Otranto, 2007. "Volatility transmission across markets: a Multichain Markov Switching model," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(8), pages 659-670.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:17:y:2007:i:8:p:659-670
    DOI: 10.1080/09603100600722151
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