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LOLA 3.0: Luxembourg OverLapping generation model for policy Analysis

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  • Luca Marchiori

    ()

  • Olivier Pierrard

    ()

Abstract

LOLA 2.0 is a dynamic general equilibrium model for the Luxembourg economy, which features overlapping generation dynamics, labormarket frictions à la Diamond-Mortensen-Pissarides and a New Open Economy Macroeconomics structure. This paper presents the model LOLA 3.0, which essentially integrates a financial sector to LOLA 2.0. In contrast to the existing dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) literature, the financial sector does not intermediate between resident households and resident firms, but exports wealth management services. We calibrate the model to match the size of the financial sector in terms of employment, value added, net exports and taxes. The 2008 financial crisis has affected Luxembourg's financial sector and slowed inflows of cross-border workers. Because there is a lot of uncertainty surrounding future growth of the Luxembourg financial sector and cross-border worker inflows, we use LOLA 3.0 to study the evolution of the Luxembourg economy between 2015 and 2060 under alternative scenarios (high - medium - low).

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Marchiori & Olivier Pierrard, 2015. "LOLA 3.0: Luxembourg OverLapping generation model for policy Analysis," BCL working papers 100, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:bcl:bclwop:bclwp100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deák, Szabolcs & Fontagné, Lionel & Maffezzoli, Marco & Marcellino, Massimiliano, 2011. "LSM: A DSGE model for Luxembourg," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2862-2872.
    2. Roberto Motto & Massimo Rostagno & Lawrence J. Christiano, 2010. "Financial Factors in Economic Fluctuations," 2010 Meeting Papers 141, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Baksa & Mihnea Constantinescu & Zsuzsa Munkacsi, 2016. "Aging, Informality and Public Policies in a Small Open Economy," Bank of Lithuania Discussion Paper Series 2, Bank of Lithuania.
    2. Daniel Baksa & Zsuzsa Munkacsi, 2016. "A Detailed Description of OGRE, the OLG Model," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 31, Bank of Lithuania.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Overlapping generations; Long-run projections; Financial sector; Luxembourg.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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