IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/arx/papers/1904.09967.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Investment in EV charging spots for parking

Author

Listed:
  • Brendan Badia
  • Randall Berry
  • Ermin Wei

Abstract

As demand for electric vehicles (EVs) is expanding, meeting the need for charging infrastructure, especially in urban areas, has become a critical issue. One method of adding charging stations is to install them at parking spots. This increases the value of these spots to EV drivers needing to charge their vehicles. However, there is a cost to constructing these spots and such spots may preclude drivers not needing to charge from using them, reducing the parking options for such drivers\color{black}. We look at two models for how decisions surrounding investment in charging stations on existing parking spots may be undertaken. First, we analyze two firms who compete over installing stations under government set mandates or subsidies. Given the cost of constructing spots and the competitiveness of the markets, we find it is ambiguous whether setting higher mandates or higher subsidies for spot construction leads to better aggregate outcomes. Second, we look at a system operator who faces uncertainty on the size of the EV market. If they are risk neutral, we find a relatively small change in the uncertainty of the EV market can lead to large changes in the optimal charging capacity.

Suggested Citation

  • Brendan Badia & Randall Berry & Ermin Wei, 2019. "Investment in EV charging spots for parking," Papers 1904.09967, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1904.09967
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1904.09967
    File Function: Latest version
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lingjie Duan & Biying Shou & Jianwei Huang, 2016. "Capacity Allocation and Pricing Strategies for New Wireless Services," Production and Operations Management, Production and Operations Management Society, vol. 25(5), pages 866-882, May.
    2. Arnott, Richard & Inci, Eren, 2006. "An integrated model of downtown parking and traffic congestion," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 418-442, November.
    3. Shoup, Donald C., 1999. "The trouble with minimum parking requirements," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 33(7-8), pages 549-574.
    4. Gibbens, R. & Mason, R. & Steinberg, Richard, 2000. "Internet service classes under competition," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 23577, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Arnott, Richard & de Palma, Andre & Lindsey, Robin, 1991. "A temporal and spatial equilibrium analysis of commuter parking," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 301-335, August.
    6. Glazer, Amihai & Niskanen, Esko, 1992. "Parking fees and congestion," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 123-132, March.
    7. Thành Nguyen & Hang Zhou & Randall A. Berry & Michael L. Honig & Rakesh Vohra, 2016. "The Cost of Free Spectrum," Operations Research, INFORMS, vol. 64(6), pages 1217-1229, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Arnott, Richard & Inci, Eren & Rowse, John, 2015. "Downtown curbside parking capacity," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 83-97.
    2. Kevin Hasker & Eren Inci, 2014. "Free Parking For All In Shopping Malls," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1281-1304, November.
    3. van Ommeren, Jos & de Groote, Jesper & Mingardo, Giuliano, 2014. "Residential parking permits and parking supply," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 33-44.
    4. Inci, Eren, 2015. "A review of the economics of parking," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 50-63.
    5. Jin Cao & Monica Menendez & Rashid Waraich, 2019. "Impacts of the urban parking system on cruising traffic and policy development: the case of Zurich downtown area, Switzerland," Transportation, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 883-908, June.
    6. Ge Gao & Huijun Sun & Jianjun Wu, 2019. "Activity-based trip chaining behavior analysis in the network under the parking fee scheme," Transportation, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 647-669, June.
    7. Kobus, Martijn B.W. & Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, Eva & Rietveld, Piet & Van Ommeren, Jos N., 2013. "The on-street parking premium and car drivers' choice between street and garage parking," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 395-403.
    8. Molenda, Inga & Sieg, Gernot, 2013. "Residential parking in vibrant city districts," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 131-139.
    9. Madsen, Edith & Mulalic, Ismir & Pilegaard, Ninette, 2013. "A model for estimation of the demand for on-street parking," MPRA Paper 52301, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Groote, Jesper De & Ommeren, Jos Van & Koster, Hans R.A., 2016. "Car ownership and residential parking subsidies: Evidence from Amsterdam," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 25-37.
    11. Geroliminis, Nikolas, 2015. "Cruising-for-parking in congested cities with an MFD representation," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 156-165.
    12. Jos Van Ommeren & Derk Wentink, 2012. "The (Hidden) Cost Of Employer Parking Policies," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(3), pages 965-978, August.
    13. Arnott, Richard & Rowse, John, 2013. "Curbside parking time limits," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 89-110.
    14. Button, Kenneth, 2006. "The political economy of parking charges in "first" and "second-best" worlds," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 470-478, November.
    15. Inci, Eren & Lindsey, Robin, 2015. "Garage and curbside parking competition with search congestion," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 49-59.
    16. van Ommeren, Jos & Wentink, Derk & Dekkers, Jasper, 2011. "The real price of parking policy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 25-31, July.
    17. Wang, Pengfei & Guan, Hongzhi & Liu, Peng, 2020. "Modeling and solving the optimal allocation-pricing of public parking resources problem in urban-scale network," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 74-98.
    18. Takayama, Yuki & Kuwahara, Masao, 2016. "Scheduling preferences, parking competition, and bottleneck congestion: A model of trip timing and parking location choices by heterogeneous commuters," MPRA Paper 68938, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Arnott, Richard, 2014. "On the optimal target curbside parking occupancy rate," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 133-144.
    20. Fosgerau, Mogens & de Palma, André, 2013. "The dynamics of urban traffic congestion and the price of parking," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 106-115.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1904.09967. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://arxiv.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: arXiv administrators (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://arxiv.org/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.