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The process of macroprudential oversight in Europe

  • Peter Sarlin
  • Henrik J. Nyman

The 2007--2008 financial crisis has paved the way for the use of macroprudential policies in supervising the financial system as a whole. This paper views macroprudential oversight in Europe as a process, a sequence of activities with the ultimate aim of safeguarding financial stability. To conceptualize a process in this context, we introduce the notion of a public collaborative process (PCP). PCPs involve multiple organizations with a common objective, where a number of dispersed organizations cooperate under various unstructured forms and take a collaborative approach to reaching the final goal. We argue that PCPs can and should essentially be managed using the tools and practices common for business processes. To this end, we conduct an assessment of process readiness for macroprudential oversight in Europe. Based upon interviews with key European policymakers and supervisors, we provide an analysis model to assess the maturity of five process enablers for macroprudential oversight. With the results of our analysis, we give clear recommendations on the areas that need further attention when macroprudential oversight is being developed, in addition to providing a general purpose framework for monitoring the impact of improvement efforts.

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Paper provided by in its series Papers with number 1312.7545.

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Date of creation: Dec 2013
Date of revision: Sep 2014
Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1312.7545
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  1. Betz, Frank & Oprica, Silviu & Peltonen, Tuomas A. & Sarlin, Peter, 2013. "Predicting distress in European banks," Working Paper Series 1597, European Central Bank.
  2. Christian Upper & Andreas Worms, 2001. "Estimating bilateral exposures in the German interbank market: is there a danger of contagion?," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Marrying the macro- and micro-prudential dimensions of financial stability, volume 1, pages 211-229 Bank for International Settlements.
  3. Holló, Dániel & Kremer, Manfred & Lo Duca, Marco, 2012. "CISS - a composite indicator of systemic stress in the financial system," Working Paper Series 1426, European Central Bank.
  4. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2008. "Is the 2007 US Sub-prime Financial Crisis So Different? An International Historical Comparison," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 339-44, May.
  5. Alessi, Lucia & Detken, Carsten, 2011. "Quasi real time early warning indicators for costly asset price boom/bust cycles: A role for global liquidity," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 520-533, September.
  6. Beverly Hirtle & Til Schuermann & Kevin Stiroh, 2009. "Macroprudential supervision of financial institutions: lessons from the SCAP," Staff Reports 409, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  7. Castrén, Olli & Fitzpatrick, Trevor & Sydow, Matthias, 2009. "Assessing portfolio credit risk changes in a sample of EU large and complex banking groups in reaction to macroeconomic shocks," Working Paper Series 1002, European Central Bank.
  8. Iman van Lelyveld & Franka Liedorp, 2006. "Interbank Contagion in the Dutch Banking Sector: A Sensitivity Analysis," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(2), May.
  9. repec:ecb:ecbwps:20111426 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. John Fell & Garry Schinasi, 2005. "Assessing Financial Stability: Exploring the Boundaries of Analysis," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 192(1), pages 102-117, April.
  11. Gorton, Gary, 1988. "Banking Panics and Business Cycles," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(4), pages 751-81, December.
  12. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Enrica Detragiache, 1998. "The Determinants of Banking Crises in Developing and Developed Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(1), pages 81-109, March.
  13. Paul de Grauwe, 2013. "Design Failures in the Eurozone - can they be fixed?," European Economy - Economic Papers 491, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
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