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Do As I Do, Not As I Say: Incentivization And The Relationship Between Cognitive Ability And Riskaversion

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  • SÉRGIO ALMEIDA DE SOUSA
  • MARCOS DE ALMEIDA RANGEL

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  • Sérgio Almeida De Sousa & Marcos De Almeida Rangel, 2014. "Do As I Do, Not As I Say: Incentivization And The Relationship Between Cognitive Ability And Riskaversion," Anais do XL Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 40th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 126, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  • Handle: RePEc:anp:en2012:126
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    References listed on IDEAS

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