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Heterogeneous Preferences For Congestion During A Wilderness Experience

  • Boxall, Peter C.
  • Rollins, Kimberly S.
  • Englin, Jeffrey E.

This analysis breaks down the congestion levels experienced during specific parts of a wilderness canoe trip. By explicitly addressing the heterogeneity in preferences for congestion during a trip, we were able to determine the relative value canoeists place on solitude at different points of a trip. Our econometric model utilizes a random effects probit framework to efficiently estimate the welfare impacts of congestion on each trip portion. The welfare effects of congestion levels vary across wilderness areas, parts of a trip and individuals.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34133
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Paper provided by University of Guelph, Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics in its series Working Papers with number 34133.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Handle: RePEc:ags:uguewp:34133
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://fare.uoguelph.ca/

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  1. Freeman, A. III & Haveman, Robert M., 1977. "Congestion, quality deterioration, and heterogeneous tastes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 225-232, October.
  2. Kimberly Rollins & Will Wistowsky & Michael Jay, 1997. "Wilderness Canoeing in Ontario: Using Cumulative Results to Update Dichotomous Choice Contingent Valuation Offer Amounts," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 45(2), pages 178-178, 07.
  3. Dorfman, Robert, 1984. "On optimal congestion," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 91-106, June.
  4. Butler, J S & Moffitt, Robert, 1982. "A Computationally Efficient Quadrature Procedure for the One-Factor Multinomial Probit Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 761-64, May.
  5. McConnell, K. E., 1988. "Heterogeneous preferences for congestion," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 251-258, September.
  6. Guilkey, David K. & Murphy, James L., 1993. "Estimation and testing in the random effects probit model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 301-317, October.
  7. Bo Shelby, 1980. "Crowding Models for Backcountry Recreation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 56(1), pages 43-55.
  8. Loomis, John B., 1997. "Panel Estimators To Combine Revealed And Stated Preference Dichotomous Choice Data," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 22(02), December.
  9. Michael, Jeffrey A. & Reiling, Stephen D., 1997. "The Role Of Expectations And Heterogeneous Preferences For Congestion In The Valuation Of Recreation Benefits," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 26(2), October.
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