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The Role of Expectations and Heterogeneous Preferences for Congestion in the Valuation of Recreation Benefits

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  • Michael, Jeffrey A.
  • Reiling, Stephen D.

Abstract

Studies of recreation congestion generally utilize nonmarket valuation techniques to determine the use level and entrance price that maximize aggregate recreation benefits for a specific recreation area. This paper improves upon these previous studies by relaxing the assumption of homogeneous preferences among visitors of the same recreation area and accounting for visitor expectations of congestion. The results indicate that failing to account for heterogeneous preferences for congestion by time of visit leads to overestimates of the benefits of relieving peak-time congestion, while accounting for expectations raises questions about the validity of the standard optimal use model.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael, Jeffrey A. & Reiling, Stephen D., 1997. "The Role of Expectations and Heterogeneous Preferences for Congestion in the Valuation of Recreation Benefits," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 166-173, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:agrerw:v:26:y:1997:i:02:p:166-173_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Timmins, Christopher & Murdock, Jennifer, 2007. "A revealed preference approach to the measurement of congestion in travel cost models," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 230-249, March.
    2. de Palma, André & Lindsey, Robin, 2020. "Tradable permit schemes for congestible facilities with uncertain supply and demand," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 21(C).
    3. George Parsons & Kelley Myers, 2017. "Fat tails and truncated bids in contingent valuation: an application to an endangered shorebird species," Chapters, in: Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train (ed.),Contingent Valuation of Environmental Goods, chapter 2, pages 17-42, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Christopher Timmins & Jennifer Murdock, 2006. "A Revealed Preference Approach to the Measurement of Congestion in Travel Cost Models," Working Papers tecipa-213, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    5. Kimberly Rollins & Diana Dumitras & Anita Castledine, 2008. "An Analysis of Congestion Effects Across and Within Multiple Recreation Activities," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(1), pages 95-116, March.
    6. Deborah Ellen Lee & Stephen Gerald Hosking & Mario Du Preez, 2015. "Managing Some Motorised Recreational Boating Challenges in South African Estuaries: A Case Study at the Kromme River Estuary," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(2), pages 286-302, June.
    7. Boxall, Peter & Rollins, Kimberly & Englin, Jeffrey, 2003. "Heterogeneous preferences for congestion during a wilderness experience," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 177-195, May.
    8. Lindsey, Robin, 2011. "State-dependent congestion pricing with reference-dependent preferences," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 1501-1526.

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