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U.S. Organic Farming Emerges in the 1990s: Adoption of Certified Systems

  • Greene, Catherine R.

Farmers have been developing organic farming systems in the United States for decades. State and private institutions also began emerging during this period to set organic farming standards and provide third-party verification of label claims, and legislation requiring national standards was passed in the 1990s. More U.S. producers are considering organic farming systems in order to lower input costs, conserve nonrenewable resources, capture high-value markets, and boost farm income. Organic farming systems rely on practices such as cultural and biological pest management, and virtually prohibit synthetic chemicals in crop production and antibiotics or hormones in livestock production. This report updates U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates of land farmed with organic practices during 1992-94 with 1997 estimates, and provides new State- and crop-level detail.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33777
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Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Agricultural Information Bulletins with number 33777.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:ags:uersab:33777
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  1. Glaser, Lewrene K. & Thompson, Gary D., 2000. "Demand For Organic And Conventional Beverage Milk," 2000 Annual Meeting, June 29-July 1, 2000, Vancouver, British Columbia 36346, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
  2. Lohr, Luanne & Semali, Adelin, 2000. "Reconciling Attitudes And Behavior In Organic Food Retailing," Faculty Series 16673, University of Georgia, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
  3. Lohr, Luanne & Salomonsson, Lennart, 2000. "Conversion subsidies for organic production: results from Sweden and lessons for the United States," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(2), March.
  4. Wesley Nimon & John C. Beghin, 1998. "Are Eco-Labels Valuable? Evidence from the Apparel Industry," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 99-wp213, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  5. Robert D. Weaver & David J. Evans & A. E. Luloff, 1992. "Pesticide use in tomato production: Consumer concerns and willingness-to-pay," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(2), pages 131-142.
  6. Welsh, Rick, 1999. "The Economics of Organic Grain and Soybean Production in the Midwestern United States," Policy Studies Program Reports, Henry A. Wallace Institute for Alternative Agriculture, number 134120.
  7. Govindasamy, Ramu & Italia, John, 1997. "Consumer Response to Integrated Pest Management and Organic Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis," P Series 36727, Rutgers University, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.
  8. Dobbs, Thomas L., 1998. "Price Premiums for Organic Crops," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 13(2).
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