IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/saea14/162551.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

U.S. Ethanol Mandate Is a Hidden Subsidy to Corn Producers

Author

Listed:
  • Vorotnikova, Ekaterina
  • Seale, James L

Abstract

Using welfare economics, this study formally shows that the RFS Ethanol mandate is a hidden subsidy to the corn producers. This link is necessary in order to properly assess the effects of the mandate on other industries. The study shows that the mandate increases world prices for corn and is trade altering.

Suggested Citation

  • Vorotnikova, Ekaterina & Seale, James L, 2014. "U.S. Ethanol Mandate Is a Hidden Subsidy to Corn Producers," 2014 Annual Meeting, February 1-4, 2014, Dallas, Texas 162551, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea14:162551
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/162551
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Catherine Hausman & Maximilian Auffhammer & Peter Berck, 2012. "Farm Acreage Shocks and Crop Prices: An SVAR Approach to Understanding the Impacts of Biofuels," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 53(1), pages 117-136, September.
    2. Thomas W. Hertel & Wallace E. Tyner & Dileep K. Birur, 2010. "The Global Impacts of Biofuel Mandates," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 75-100.
    3. Hamelinck, Carlo N & Faaij, Andre P.C., 2006. "Outlook for advanced biofuels," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(17), pages 3268-3283, November.
    4. Lihong Lu McPhail & Bruce A. Babcock, 2008. "Short-Run Price and Welfare Impacts of Federal Ethanol Policies," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 08-wp468, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    5. Harry de Gorter & David R. Just, 2010. "The Social Costs and Benefits of Biofuels: The Intersection of Environmental, Energy and Agricultural Policy," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 4-32.
    6. Schmitz Andrew & Moss Charles B. & Schmitz Troy G., 2007. "Ethanol: No Free Lunch," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-28, December.
    7. Chen, Xiaoguang & Huang, Haixiao & Khanna, Madhu, 2011. "Land Use and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Biofuels: Role of Technology and Policy," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103216, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Schmitz, Andrew & Schmitz, Troy G. & Seale, James L., Jr., 2003. "Ethanol from Sugar: The Case of Hidden Sugar Subsidies in Brazil," Policy Briefs 15679, University of Florida, International Agricultural Trade and Policy Center.
    9. Mark W. Rosegrant & Tingju Zhu & Siwa Msangi & Timothy Sulser, 2008. "Global Scenarios for Biofuels: Impacts and Implications," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 30(3), pages 495-505.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hidden Subsidy; Corn; Ethanol Mandate; Welfare Analysis; Agricultural and Food Policy; Production Economics;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:saea14:162551. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/saeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.