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Chinese Market Access Barriers of U.S Oilseeds and Grains

  • Yeboah, Osei-Agyeman
  • Appiah-Danquah, Gloria
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    China was admitted into the WTO in December 2001 and this raised the hopes of the US that China will open up to agricultural trade with the US. However, this potential has not been realized. The goal of this study is to determine the impacts of trade impediments and barriers of the market access of US oilseeds and grains in China. A market access variable that was obtained by dividing the total value of U.S soybean and corn exports to China by U.S agricultural G.D.P was regressed on China’s per capita income, exchange rate of the yuan to the dollar, arable land to labor ratio in the U.S and a dummy variable representing China’s WTO accession. The result found per capita income to have a positive impact on market access of U.S oilseeds and grains in China. Exchange rate of the yuan to the dollar was found to be significant and has a negative impact on market access. However, China’s WTO accession and the arable land to labor ratio in the U.S did not have any significance on the market access of U.S oilseeds and grains.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/119794
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    Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama with number 119794.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:saea12:119794
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.saea.org/

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    1. Virginie Coudert & Cécile Couharde, 2008. "Currency Misalignments and Exchange Rate Regimes in Emerging and Developing Countries," Working Papers 2008-07, CEPII research center.
    2. Peter Egger & Michael Pfaffermayr, 2001. "Distance, Trade and FDI: A Hausman-Taylor SUR Approach," WIFO Working Papers 164, WIFO.
    3. Peter Egger & Michael Pfaffermayr, 2000. "Trade, multinational sales, and FDI in a three-factors model," Economics working papers 2000-13, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
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