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Alternative Instruments for Ensuring Food Security and Price Stability in Zambia

Author

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  • Dorosh, Paul A.
  • Dradri, Simon
  • Haggblade, Steven

Abstract

Given heavy dependence on rainfed maize production, Zambia must routinely cope with pronounced production and consumption volatility in their primary food staple. Typical policy responses include increased food aid flows, government commercial imports and stock releases, and tight controls on private sector trade. This paper examines recent experience in Zambia, using a simple economic model to assess the likely impact of maize production shocks on the domestic maize price and on staple food consumption under alternative policy regimes. In addition to an array of public policy instruments, the analysis evaluates the quantitative impact of two key private sector responses in moderating food consumption volatility— private cross-border maize trade and consumer substitution of an alternate food staple (cassava) for maize. The analysis suggests that, given a favorable policy environment, private imports and increased cassava consumption together could fill roughly two-thirds of the maize consumption shortfall facing vulnerable households during drought years.

Suggested Citation

  • Dorosh, Paul A. & Dradri, Simon & Haggblade, Steven, 2007. "Alternative Instruments for Ensuring Food Security and Price Stability in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54488, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:54488
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54488
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Haggblade, Steven, 2006. "Maize Price Projections for Zambia's 2006/07 Marketing Season," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54619, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, T.S. & Myers, Robert J., 2006. "Managing food price risks and instability in a liberalizing market environment: Overview and policy options," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 275-287, August.
    3. Alderman, Harold & del Ninno, Carlo, 1999. "Poverty Issues for Zero Rating VAT in South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(2), pages 182-208, July.
    4. Dorosh, Paul A. & Haggblade, Steven, 1997. "Shifting sands: The changing case for monetizing project food aid in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 2093-2104, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Govereh, Jones & Haggblade, Steven & Nielson, Hunter & Tschirley, David L., 2008. "Maize Market Sheds in Eastern and Southern Africa. Report 1," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55374, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Dorosh, Paul A. & Dradri, Simon & Haggblade, Steven, 2007. "Alternative Approaches for Moderating Food Insecurity and Price Volatility in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54630, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Tschirley, David L. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2008. "Food Crises and Food Markets: Implications for Emergency Response in Southern Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54559, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. World Bank, 2008. "Regional Trade in Food Staples : Prospects for Stimulating Agricultural Growth and Moderation Food Security Crises in Eastern and Southern Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7829, The World Bank.
    5. Khonje, Makaiko & Mkandawire, Petros & Manda, Julius & Alene, Arega, 2015. "Analysis of adoption and impacts of improved cassava varieties," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211842, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food security; policy; Zambia; Africa; price; Crop Production/Industries; Food Security and Poverty; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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