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The profitability of inorganic fertilizer use in smallholder maize production in Tanzania: Implications for alternative strategies to improve smallholder maize productivity

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  • Mather, David
  • Minde, Isaac
  • Waized, Betty
  • Ndyetabula, Daniel
  • Temu, Anna

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  • Mather, David & Minde, Isaac & Waized, Betty & Ndyetabula, Daniel & Temu, Anna, 2016. "The profitability of inorganic fertilizer use in smallholder maize production in Tanzania: Implications for alternative strategies to improve smallholder maize productivity," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245891, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:245891
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.245891
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/245891/files/TZ_smallholde_profitability_of_fertilizer_use_finalWP.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nigel Key & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Alain De Janvry, 2000. "Transactions Costs and Agricultural Household Supply Response," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 245-259.
    2. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1996. "Technical Change and Human-Capital Returns and Investments: Evidence from the Green Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 931-953, September.
    3. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
    4. Tschirley, David L. & Jayne, T.S., 2010. "Exploring the Logic Behind Southern Africa's Food Crises," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 76-87, January.
    5. Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Farmers' Demand for Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa," Staff Paper Series 11612, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. World Bank, 2014. "Tanzania Public Expenditure Review : National Agricultural Input Voucher Scheme," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18247, The World Bank.
    7. Paswel P. Marenya & Christopher B. Barrett, 2009. "State-conditional Fertilizer Yield Response on Western Kenyan Farms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 991-1006.
    8. Shenggen Fan & Ashok Gulati & Sukhadeo Thorat, 2008. "Investment, subsidies, and pro‐poor growth in rural India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 163-170, September.
    9. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-1417, November.
    10. Anderson, Jock R. & Dillon, John L. & Hardaker, Brian, 1977. "Agricultural Decision Analysis," Monographs: Applied Economics, AgEcon Search, number 288652, September.
    11. Zhiying Xu & Zhengfei Guan & T.S. Jayne & Roy Black, 2009. "Factors influencing the profitability of fertilizer use on maize in Zambia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(4), pages 437-446, July.
    12. Peter Berck & Gloria Helfand, 1990. "Reconciling the von Liebig and Differentiable Crop Production Functions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 72(4), pages 985-996.
    13. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2018. "Review: Taking stock of Africa’s second-generation agricultural input subsidy programs," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-14.
    2. Mather, David & Minde, Isaac, 2016. "Fertilizer subsidies and how targeting conditions crowding in/out: An assessment of smallholder fertilizer demand in Tanzania," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 260442, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Jayne, Thomas & Muyanga, Milu & Sanou, Awa, 2017. "Are African Farmers Experiencing Improved Incentives To Use Fertilizer?," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 270632, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    4. Kanyamuka, Joseph S. & Nankhuni, Flora J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Munthali, Moses W., 2018. "Making Fertilizer Use More Effective and Profitable: The Role of Complementary Interventions," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Briefs 275670, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    5. Mather, David & Ndyetabula, Daniel, 2016. "Assessing The Drivers Of Tanzania’S Fertilizer Subsidy Programs From 2003-2016: An Application Of The Kaleidoscope Model Of Policy Change," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 259516, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development; Productivity Analysis;

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