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The Effect of Rainfall Variation on Agricultural Households: Evidence from Mexico

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  • Meza-Pale, Pablo
  • Yunez-Naude, Antonio

Abstract

This paper presents results of the rainfall impact on agricultural production and net income for rural households in Mexico using a two-year panel data set. We construct a metric on rainfall variation using historical data from weather stations across Mexico. The relationship between our rainfall measure and agricultural production indicates a consistent negative effect on maize production, specially for rain-fed and small farmers. Moreover, there is mixed evidence for non-maize crops production and non-significant rainfall impact for household’s net income.

Suggested Citation

  • Meza-Pale, Pablo & Yunez-Naude, Antonio, 2015. "The Effect of Rainfall Variation on Agricultural Households: Evidence from Mexico," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212457, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:212457
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/212457/files/Meza-The%20Effect%20of%20Rainfall%20Variation%20on%20Agricultural%20Households-931.pdf
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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Environmental Economics and Policy;

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