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Impact of Mobile Telephone on the Quality and Speed of Agricultural Extension Services Delivery: Evidence from the Rural India

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  • Akter, Shaheen
  • Fu, Xiaolan

Abstract

This study examines the impact of a mobile phone technology enhanced services on agricultural extension services delivery system in India. An impact analysis is carried out based on randomised survey data taking into account of potential systematic selection bias through double difference techniques and reflexive comparisons. Findings from the research show that the amount and quality of the services and the speed of services delivery have been improved significantly as a result of the intervention. Evidence from the evaluation suggests that disadvantaged farmers benefit more from this intervention than those who are better off.

Suggested Citation

  • Akter, Shaheen & Fu, Xiaolan, 2012. "Impact of Mobile Telephone on the Quality and Speed of Agricultural Extension Services Delivery: Evidence from the Rural India," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126798, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126798
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126798
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 2003. "Does piped water reduce diarrhea for children in rural India?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 153-173, January.
    2. Gershon Feder & Rinku Murgai & Jaime B. Quizon, 2004. "Sending Farmers Back to School: The Impact of Farmer Field Schools in Indonesia," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 45-62.
    3. Owens, Trudy & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension on Farm Production in Resettlement Areas of Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 337-357, January.
    4. White, Howard, 2006. "Impact evaluation: the experience of the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank," MPRA Paper 1111, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
    6. Anderson, Jock R. & Feder, Gershon, 2007. "Agricultural Extension," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
    7. Birner, Regina & Anderson, Jock R., 2007. "How to make agricultural extension demand-driven?: The case of India's agricultural extension policy," IFPRI discussion papers 729, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Shyamal K. Chowdhury, 2006. "Investments in ICT-capital and economic performance of small and medium scale enterprises in East Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 533-552.
    9. Kraemer, Kenneth L. & Dedrick, Jason, 1994. "Payoffs from investment in information technology: Lessons from the Asia-Pacific region," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(12), pages 1921-1931, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eduardo Nakasone & Maximo Torero, 2016. "A text message away: ICTs as a tool to improve food security," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(S1), pages 49-59, November.

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