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Impacts of Cash Crop Production on Land Management and Land Degradation: The Case of Coffee and Cotton in Uganda

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Listed:
  • Pender, John L.
  • Nkonya, Ephraim M.
  • Kato, Edward
  • Kaizzi, Crammer
  • Ssali, Henry

Abstract

We investigate the impacts of coffee and cotton production on land management and land degradation in Uganda, based on a survey of 851 households and soil measurements in six major agro-ecological zones, using matching and multivariate regression methods. The impacts of cash crop production vary by agro-ecological zones and cropping system. In coffee producing zones, use of organic inputs is most common on plots growing coffee with other crops (mainly bananas), and least common on mono-cropped coffee. Both mono-cropped coffee and mixed coffee plots have lower soil erosion than other plots in coffee producing zones because of greater soil cover. Potassium depletion is much greater on mixed banana-coffee plots. In the cotton production zone, few land management practices or investments are used, especially on cotton plots. Soil erosion and soil nutrient depletion are lower in the cotton zone than in coffee producing zones because of flatter terrain and lower crop yields. Soil erosion is much higher on cotton than non-cotton plots in this zone. These results imply that promotion of cash crop production will not halt land degradation, and in some cases will worsen it, unless substantial efforts are made to promote adoption of sustainable land management practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Pender, John L. & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Kato, Edward & Kaizzi, Crammer & Ssali, Henry, 2009. "Impacts of Cash Crop Production on Land Management and Land Degradation: The Case of Coffee and Cotton in Uganda," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50760, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:50760
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/50760/files/IAAE%20paper_Pender.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Menale Kassie & John Pender & Mahmud Yesuf & Gunnar Kohlin & Randy Bluffstone & Elias Mulugeta, 2008. "Estimating returns to soil conservation adoption in the northern Ethiopian highlands," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(2), pages 213-232, March.
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    5. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John & Kaizzi, Crammer & Edward, Kato & Mugarura, Samuel, 2005. "Policy options for increasing crop productivity and reducing soil nutrient depletion and poverty in Uganda:," EPTD discussion papers 134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Florence Kondylis & Valerie Mueller & S. Zhu, 2015. "Measuring agricultural knowledge and adoption," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(3), pages 449-462, May.

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