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Can We Feed the Animals? Origins and Implications of Rising Meat Demand

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  • Keyzer, Michiel A.
  • Merbis, Max D.
  • Pavel, Ferdinand

Abstract

The paper argues that current long-term projections of global meat and feed demand may underestimate future consumption patterns for mainly two reasons. First, they do not explicitly consider increased demand for protein foods of animal origin with rising incomes in some developing countries, and second they do not allow for changes in livestock technology, in particular feed demand. We then project the impact of both mechanisms to show the empirical relevance of our comments and suggest ready-to-use tools to consider them within standard projection models.

Suggested Citation

  • Keyzer, Michiel A. & Merbis, Max D. & Pavel, Ferdinand, 2002. "Can We Feed the Animals? Origins and Implications of Rising Meat Demand," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24955, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae02:24955
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/24955
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Babcock, Bruce A. & Beghin, John C. & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & de Cara, Stephane & Elobeid, Amani E. & Fang, Cheng & Fuller, Frank H. & Hart, Chad E. & Isik, Murat & Matthey, Holger & Saak, Alexander E. , 2002. "FAPRI 2002 World Agricultural Outlook," Staff Reports 32051, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI).
    2. Mitchell,Donald O. & Ingco,Merlinda D. & Duncan,Ronald C., 1997. "The World Food Outlook," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521589840.
    3. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    4. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    5. Awudu Abdulai & Devendra K. Jain & Ashok K. Sharma, 1999. "Household Food Demand Analysis in India," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 316-327.
    6. José Benjamin Falck-Zepeda & Greg Traxler & Robert G. Nelson, 2000. "Surplus Distribution from the Introduction of a Biotechnology Innovation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 360-369.
    7. Bhalla, G. S. & Hazell, P. B. R. & Kerr, John M., 1999. "Prospects for India's cereal supply and demand to 2020:," 2020 vision briefs 63, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Bhalla, G. S. & Hazell, P. B. R. & Kerr, John M., 1999. "Prospects for India's cereal supply and demand to 2020:," 2020 vision discussion papers 29, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Balogh, Peter & Ertsey, Imre & Szucs, Istvan, 2009. "Answer to the challenges of the 21st century in the Hungarian pig sector," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51027, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Risku-Norja, Helmi & Maenpaa, Ilmo, 2007. "MFA model to assess economic and environmental consequences of food production and consumption," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 700-711, February.

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