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Context-Dependent Biodiversity Conservation Management Regimes: Theory and Simulations

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  • Gjertsen, Heidi
  • Barrett, Christopher B.

Abstract

Ecosystem degradation hasmotivated a search for successful conservation approaches. The perceived failure of state-directed protected areas in the tropics has prompted experimentation with community management and co-management strategies. Numerous case studies suggest that none of these are effective universally. There exists, however, little analytical or empirical work to identify under what conditions one arrangement will be more effective than another. This paper develops a model of statedependent, equilibrium conservation management design that identifies the comparative advantage of different managers, in the interest of appropriately locating authority for conservation tasks as a function of prevailing biophysical, economic, and sociopolitical conditions.
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Suggested Citation

  • Gjertsen, Heidi & Barrett, Christopher B., 2003. "Context-Dependent Biodiversity Conservation Management Regimes: Theory and Simulations," Working Papers 127207, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:cudawp:127207
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/127207
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Agrawal, Arun, 2001. "Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1649-1672, October.
    2. Brown, David N & Pomeroy, Robert S, 1999. "Co-management of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) fisheries," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 549-570, November.
    3. Skonhoft, Anders & Solstad, Jan Tore, 1996. "Wildlife management, illegal hunting and conflicts. A bioeconomic analysis," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 165-181, May.
    4. Anders Skonhoft & Jan Tore Solstad, 1998. "The Political Economy of Wildlife Exploitation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(1), pages 16-31.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Raghbendra Jha & K.V. Bhanu Murthy, 2003. "A Critique of the Environmental Sustainability Index," Departmental Working Papers 2003-08, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    2. Luis Escobar & Harrie Vredenburg, 2011. "Multinational Oil Companies and the Adoption of Sustainable Development: A Resource-Based and Institutional Theory Interpretation of Adoption Heterogeneity," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 98(1), pages 39-65, January.
    3. Barrett, Christopher B. & Lee, David R. & McPeak, John G., 2005. "Institutional Arrangements for Rural Poverty Reduction and Resource Conservation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 193-197, February.
    4. Vollan, Björn, 2012. "Pitfalls of Externally Initiated Collective Action: A Case Study from South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 758-770.
    5. Sarker, Ashutosh & Ikeda, Toru & Abe, Takaki & Inoue, Ken, 2015. "Design principles for managing coastal fisheries commons in present-day Japan," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 32-38.
    6. David J. Pannell, 2009. "Technology change as a policy response to promote changes in land management for environmental benefits," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 95-102, January.
    7. Stefanie Engel & Charles Palmer & Alexander Pfaff, 2013. "On the Endogeneity of Resource Co-management: Theory and Evidence from Indonesia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 308-329.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land

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