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The Political Economy of Wildlife Exploitation

Author

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  • Anders Skonhoft
  • Jan Tore Solstad

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the exploitation of wildlife in a Third World context. In the model there are two agents: an agency managing a habitat area of fixed size and a group of peasants. The agency managing the habitat area has the legal right to exploit the wildlife, while the local people hunt illegally. Introducing the concept of relative harvesting dominance, we demonstrate that the stock utilization depends crucially on the prevailing economic and ecological conditions. It is also shown that the existing property-rights regime appears in different forms depending on these conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Anders Skonhoft & Jan Tore Solstad, 1998. "The Political Economy of Wildlife Exploitation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(1), pages 16-31.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:74:y:1998:i:1:p:16-31
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sébastien Foudi, 2012. "Exploitation of soil biota ecosystem services in agriculture: a bioeconomic approach," Working Papers 2012-02, BC3.
    2. Winkler, Ralph, 2011. "Why do ICDPs fail?: The relationship between agriculture, hunting and ecotourism in wildlife conservation," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 55-78, January.
    3. FOUDI Sebastien, 2006. "Agriculture and Resource Exploitation: A Dynamic Bioeconomic Model of Agricultural Effort and Land Use Determination," LERNA Working Papers 06.25.218, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    4. Samson Mukanjari, Edwin Muchapondwa, Precious Zikhali and Birgit Bednar-Friedl, 2012. "Evaluating the Prospects of Benefit Sharing Schemes in Protecting Mountain Gorillas in Central Africa," Working Papers 321, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    5. Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Doris Behrens & Michael Getzner, 2012. "Optimal Dynamic Control of Visitors and Endangered Species in a National Park," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(1), pages 1-22, May.
    6. Heidi Gjertsen & HChristopher B. Barrett, 2004. "Context-Dependent Biodiversity Conservation Management Regimes: Theory and Simulation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(3), pages 321-339.
    7. Bandara, Ranjith & Tisdell, Clement A., 2003. "Willingness of Sri Lankan Farmers to pay for a Scheme to Conserve Elephants: An Empirical Analysis," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 48954, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    8. Anders Skonhoft, 1999. "On the Optimal Exploitation of Terrestrial Animal Species," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(1), pages 45-57, January.
    9. Anne Johannesen & Anders Skonhoft, 2004. "Property Rights and Natural Resource Conservation. A Bio-Economic Model with Numerical Illustrations from the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(4), pages 469-488, August.
    10. repec:eee:resene:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:55-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Horatiu A. Rus, 2012. "Environmental Depletion, Governance, and Conflict," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1305-1332, April.
    12. Anne Borge Johannesen, 2005. "Protected areas, wildlife conservation and local welfare," Working Paper Series 6005, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    13. Johannesen, Anne Borge, 2007. "Protected areas, wildlife conservation, and local welfare," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 126-135, April.
    14. Doris Behrens & Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Michael Getzner, 2009. "Sustainable management of an alpine national park: handling the two-edged effect of tourism," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 17(3), pages 233-253, September.
    15. Anne Borge Johannesen, 2003. "Designing Integrated Conservation and Development Projects (ICDPs): Illegal hunting, wildlife conservation and the welfare of the local people," Working Paper Series 3704, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    16. Ralph Winkler, 2007. "Why do ICDPs fail? The relationship between subsistence farming, poaching and eco- tourism in wildlife and habitat conservation," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 07/76, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    17. Foudi, Sébastien, 2012. "The role of farmers' property rights in soil ecosystem services conservation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 90-96.
    18. Ola Flaaten & Einar Mjølhus, 2010. "Nature Reserves as a Bioeconomic Management Tool: A Simplified Modelling Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 47(1), pages 125-148, September.
    19. Horatiu Rus, 2014. "Corruption, conflict and the management of natural resources," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 355-386, November.
    20. David J. Pannell, 2009. "Technology change as a policy response to promote changes in land management for environmental benefits," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 95-102, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources

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