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Age and Farmer Productivity

Author

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  • Tauer, Loren W.

Abstract

Farmer productivity by age was estimated, allowing for differences because of efficiency and returns to scale. Using Census of Agriculture data, estimates vary by state, but returns to scale average 1.07. Efficiency increases average 4.5 percent every ten years of age, to the age interval 35 to 44, and then decreases at that same rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Tauer, Loren W., 1994. "Age and Farmer Productivity," Staff Papers 121316, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:cudasp:121316
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/121316
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chambers,Robert G., 1988. "Applied Production Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521314275, April.
    2. Diewert, W. E., 1976. "Exact and superlative index numbers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-145, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lordkipanidze, Nazibrola & Tauer, Loren W., 2000. "Farmer Efficiency and Technology Use with Age," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(01), pages 24-31, April.
    2. Karagiannis, Giannis & Sarris, Alexander H., 2002. "Direct Subsidies and Technical Efficiency in Greek Agriculture," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24868, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Giannis Karagiannis, 2005. "Explaining output growth with a heteroscedastic non-neutral production frontier: the case of sheep farms in Greece," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 51-74, March.
    4. Purdy, Barry M. & Langemeier, Michael R. & Featherstone, Allen M., 1997. "Financial Performance, Risk, and Specialization," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(01), pages 149-161, July.
    5. Nonthakot, Phanin & Villano, Renato A., 2008. "Migration and Farm Efficiency: Evidence from Northern Thailand," 2008 Conference (52nd), February 5-8, 2008, Canberra, Australia 5981, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    6. El-Osta, Hirsham S. & Johnson, James, 1998. "Determinanats of Financial Performance of Commercial Dairy Farms," Technical Bulletins 184378, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. G. Karagiannis & V. Tzouvelekas & A. Xepapadeas, 2003. "Measuring Irrigation Water Efficiency with a Stochastic Production Frontier," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(1), pages 57-72, September.
    8. Henderson, Benjamin B. & Kingwell, Ross S., 2001. "An Investigation of the Technical and Allocative Efficiency of Broadacre Farmers," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 125109, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    9. Asfaw, Solomon & Lipper, Leslie, 2015. "Adaptation to Climate Change and its Impacts on Food Security: Evidence from Niger," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 225667, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Peake, Whitney O. & Marshall, Maria I., 2009. "Has the "Farm Problem" Disappeared? A Comparison of Household and Self-Employment Income Levels of the Farm and Nonfarm Self-Employed," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46304, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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