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Designing REDD+ Schemes to Address Permanence Concerns: Empirical Evidence from Kenya

  • Veronesi, Marcella
  • Schlondorn, Tim
  • Zabel, Astrid
  • Engel, Stefanie

Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) is an important topic in the debate on policies to mitigate climate change. This is the first study to test and compare the environmental impact of different REDD+ payment schemes in the field, and provide some insights on the effectiveness of different policies with respect to the permanence of forest-based emission reductions. This study implements a stated preference experiment of time allocation in the unique setting of the Kasigau Corridor REDD+ Project in Kenya, where charcoaling is a major source of forest degradation. The impact on time allocation is analyzed under the presumption that a hypothetical agricultural policy or an eco-charcoaling policy was introduced. We find that a policy that indexes eco-charcoal payments to charcoalers’ opportunity costs is the most effective policy in providing permanence in REDD+: it lowers the amount of labor allocated to charcoaling even at high charcoal prices.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/124131
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Paper provided by Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA) in its series Congress Papers with number 124131.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aieacp:124131
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