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Designing and Implementing Effective REDD + Policies: A Forest Transition Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Arild Angelsen
  • Thomas K. Rudel

Abstract

Effective policies to halt deforestation depend critically on the forest context. This article uses a forest transition framework to discuss three forest contexts: remote (core) forest areas, frontier forests, and forest-agriculture mosaics. Just as the drivers and capabilities differ across these three contexts or stages, so too do the appropriate government policies. The first stage represents forests that are protected passively by their remote location, where the challenge is to maintain low deforestation rates. Thus high priority should be given to avoiding or redesigning infrastructure developments, resettlements, and other large-scale projects that can accelerate deforestation. Clarifying tenure and local forest rights and creating protected areas can also be helpful. In frontier forests, well-defined property rights, if present, provide a basis for using direct incentive and compensation schemes such as payments for environmental services. Avoiding perverse government policies, such as subsidized credit for deforesting activities, would also reduce the high deforestation rates that characterize this second stage. In largely settled forest-agriculture mosaics, government policies can augment emerging market-based incentives to plant trees. Improved agricultural technologies, which at early stages tend to stimulate agricultural land expansion, can also be important at later stages by increasing food production on existing agricultural land. (JEL: O13, Q28, Q54) Copyright 2013, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Arild Angelsen & Thomas K. Rudel, 2013. "Designing and Implementing Effective REDD + Policies: A Forest Transition Approach," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(1), pages 91-113, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:renvpo:v:7:y:2013:i:1:p:91-113
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/reep/res022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert T. Deacon, 1999. "Deforestation and Ownership: Evidence from Historical Accounts and Contemporary Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(3), pages 341-359.
    2. Andersen,Lykke E. & Granger,Clive W. J. & Reis,Eustaquio J. & Weinhold,Diana & Wunder,Sven, 2002. "The Dynamics of Deforestation and Economic Growth in the Brazilian Amazon," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521811972.
    3. Gerald C. Nelson & Daniel Hellerstein, 1997. "Do Roads Cause Deforestation? Using Satellite Images in Econometric Analysis of Land Use," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 80-88.
    4. Alston, Lee J. & Libecap, Gary D. & Mueller, Bernardo, 2000. "Land Reform Policies, the Sources of Violent Conflict, and Implications for Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 162-188, March.
    5. Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2003. "Economic Growth and the Rise of Forests," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(2), pages 601-637.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nystad Handberg , Øyvind & Angelsen, Arild, 2016. "Pay little, get little; pay more, get a little more: A framed forest experiment in Tanzania," Working Paper Series 02-2016, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business.
    2. Julien Wolfersberger & G. Amacher & Philippe Delacote & Arnaud Dragicevic, 2014. "The dynamics of deforestation and reforestation in a developing economy," Working Papers hal-01628386, HAL.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:6:p:1760-:d:149284 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Barbier, Edward B. & Tesfaw, Anteneh, 2015. "Explaining forest transitions: The role of governance," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 252-261.
    5. Brockhaus, Maria & Di Gregorio, Monica & Mardiah, Sofi, 2014. "Governing the design of national REDD+: An analysis of the power of agency," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 23-33.
    6. Meine Noordwijk & Fahmuddin Agus & Sonya Dewi & Herry Purnomo, 2014. "Reducing emissions from land use in Indonesia: motivation, policy instruments and expected funding streams," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 677-692, August.
    7. Veronesi, Marcella & Reutemann, Tim & Zabel, Astrid & Engel, Stefanie, 2015. "Designing REDD+ schemes when forest users are not forest landowners: Evidence from a survey-based experiment in Kenya," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 46-57.
    8. repec:eee:resene:v:49:y:2017:i:c:p:33-47 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Alix-Garcia, Jennifer & Wolff, Hendrik, 2014. "Payment for Ecosystem Services from Forests," IZA Discussion Papers 8179, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Yankuic Galvan-Miyoshi & Robert Walker & Barney Warf, 2015. "Land Change Regimes and the Evolution of the Maize-Cattle Complex in Neoliberal Mexico," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(3), pages 1-24, August.
    11. Wolfersberger, Julien & Delacote, Philippe & Garcia, Serge, 2015. "An empirical analysis of forest transition and land-use change in developing countries," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 241-251.
    12. Duchelle, Amy E. & Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M. & Wunder, Sven & Börner, Jan & Kainer, Karen A., 2014. "Smallholder Specialization Strategies along the Forest Transition Curve in Southwestern Amazonia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 149-158.
    13. Barua, Sepul K. & Lintunen, Jussi & Uusivuori, Jussi & Kuuluvainen, Jari, 2014. "On the economics of tropical deforestation: Carbon credit markets and national policies," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 36-45.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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