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Economic assessment of technologies aimed at reducing air pollution in rice-wheat farming system in north-west India

Author

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  • Crean, Jason
  • Milham, Nick
  • Singh, Rajinder

Abstract

The burning of rice stubbles is widely practised in rice based farming systems in north-west India (Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh). The practice leads to substantial air pollution and associated adverse health effects, increased greenhouse emissions, loss of soil organic matter and lower soil moisture levels. The recently developed ‘Happy Seeder’ (HS) technology, a tractor powered machine capable of direct drilling wheat in standing rice stubbles, provides an alternative to burning. However, the adoption of this technology has been limited and burning of rice stubbles remains widespread. The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) funded research to assess possible policy responses to encourage alternatives to stubble burning. In this paper we use a whole farm model to evaluate potential policy incentives that might lead to the wider adoption. We assess farm level responses to alternative settings and consider the merits of different forms of intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Crean, Jason & Milham, Nick & Singh, Rajinder, 2013. "Economic assessment of technologies aimed at reducing air pollution in rice-wheat farming system in north-west India," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152178, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare13:152178
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/152178
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Millham, Nick & Crean, Jason & Singh, Rajinder Pal, 2011. "The implications of policy settings on land use and agricultural technology adoption in North-West India," 2011 Conference (55th), February 8-11, 2011, Melbourne, Australia 100686, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. Davenport, Scott V. & Chadha, R. & Gale, R., 2009. "Competition Policy Reform in Agriculture: A Comparison of the BRICs Countries," 2009 Conference (53rd), February 11-13, 2009, Cairns, Australia 48154, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Birner, Regina & Gupta, Surupa & Sharma, Neeru, 2011. "The political economy of agricultural policy reform in India: Fertilizers and electricity for irrigation," Research reports reginabirner, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Marra, Michele & Pannell, David J. & Abadi Ghadim, Amir, 2003. "The economics of risk, uncertainty and learning in the adoption of new agricultural technologies: where are we on the learning curve?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 75(2-3), pages 215-234.
    5. Pursell, Garry & Gulati, Ashok & Gupta, Kanupriya, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in India," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48483, World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stubble burning; environmental pollution; technology; policy; rice; Crop Production/Industries; Environmental Economics and Policy; International Relations/Trade;

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