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Cattle breeding in Northern Australia: Revealing how consumers react to new technologies

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Listed:
  • Pluske, Johanna M.
  • Burton, Michael P.
  • Rigby, Dan
  • Vercoe, Philip E.

Abstract

In Australia, Bos taurus cattle breeds produce high quality meat, superior in taste and tenderness characteristics. Nevertheless, these breeds do not thrive in the Northern Australian environment. Stem cell transplant techniques could improve northern beef cattle breeding programs by facilitating crossbreeding via natural service. Focus groups were used in this study to explore consumer reaction to reproduction technologies and the implications for buying intentions. Findings suggested that consumers may react negatively to unconventional breeding technologies but the degree of this aversion is contingent upon how the technology is described. These findings are relevant for preparation of choice modeling surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • Pluske, Johanna M. & Burton, Michael P. & Rigby, Dan & Vercoe, Philip E., 2009. "Cattle breeding in Northern Australia: Revealing how consumers react to new technologies," 2009 Conference (53rd), February 11-13, 2009, Cairns, Australia 48167, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare09:48167
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.48167
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/48167/files/Pluske.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hallman, William K. & Hebden, W. Carl & Aquino, Helen L. & Cuite, Cara L. & Lang, John T., 2003. "Public Perceptions Of Genetically Modified Foods: A National Study Of American Knowledge And Opinion," Research Reports 18174, Rutgers University, Food Policy Institute.
    2. Riccardo Scarpa & John M. Rose, 2008. "Design efficiency for non-market valuation with choice modelling: how to measure it, what to report and why ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(3), pages 253-282, September.
    3. Aldrich, Lorna M. & Blisard, Noel, 1998. "Consumer Acceptance of Biotechnology: Lessons From the rbST Experience," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33663, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Danny Campbell & W. Hutchinson & Riccardo Scarpa, 2008. "Incorporating Discontinuous Preferences into the Analysis of Discrete Choice Experiments," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(3), pages 401-417, November.
    5. David Hensher & John Rose & William Greene, 2005. "The implications on willingness to pay of respondents ignoring specific attributes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 203-222, May.
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