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Pathogen Reduction Options In Slaughterhouses And Methods For Evaluating Their Economic Effectiveness

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  • Narrod, Clare A.
  • Malcolm, Scott A.
  • Ollinger, Michael
  • Roberts, Tanya

Abstract

Foodborne pathogens cause millions of human illnesses annually, many resulting in death or chronic illnesses. Universal methods to evaluate microbial risks and their associated costs have yet to be developed. Typically, risk analysis and economic analysis have been carried out independently. In this paper, we link a risk analysis model based on typical slaughterhouse practices with a decision model to evaluate the cost effectiveness of various combinations of pathogen reducing technologies. We describe technological change with regard to pathogen reduction in meat and compare the use, effectiveness, and the degree to which different control technologies have penetrated the market. We follow with the description of a cost-effectiveness framework for evaluating technology adoption and provide an illustration for generic E. coli. In particular, we show that some options appear in every combination of technologies that are not inferior in both the cost dimension and effectiveness, and should be preferred. The paper concludes with a discussion of the institutional (and other) barriers affecting the adoption and development of more effective technologies for pathogen reduction.

Suggested Citation

  • Narrod, Clare A. & Malcolm, Scott A. & Ollinger, Michael & Roberts, Tanya, 1999. "Pathogen Reduction Options In Slaughterhouses And Methods For Evaluating Their Economic Effectiveness," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21562, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea99:21562
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21562
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laurian Unnevehr & James Eales & Helen Jensen & Jayson Lusk & Jill McCluskey & Jean Kinsey, 2010. "Food and Consumer Economics," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(2), pages 506-521.
    2. Jensen, Helen H. & Unnevehr, Laurian J. & Gómez, Miguel I., 1998. "Costs of Improving Food Safety in the Meat Sector," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(01), pages 83-94, July.
    3. Morrison, Rosanna Mentzer & Buzby, Jean C. & Lin, C.T. Jordan, 1997. "Irradiating Ground Beef to Enhance Food Safety," Food Review: The Magazine of Food Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, vol. 20(1).
    4. Libecap, Gary D, 1992. "The Rise of the Chicago Packers and the Origins of Meat Inspection and Antitrust," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(2), pages 242-262, April.
    5. Norris, Patricia E. & Thurow, Amy Purvis, 1997. "Environmental Policy And Technology Adoption In Animal Agriculture," Staff Papers 11660, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Helen H. Jensen & Laurian J. Unnevehr & Miguel I. Gomez, 1998. "Costs of Improving Food Safety in the Meat Sector, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 98-wp189, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    7. Klein, Benjamin & Leffler, Keith B, 1981. "The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(4), pages 615-641, August.
    8. Buzby, Jean C. & Roberts, Tanya, 1997. "Guillain-Barre Syndrome Increases Foodborne Disease Costs," Food Review: The Magazine of Food Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, vol. 20(3).
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