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Cognitive Skills, Non-Cognitive Skills, and the Employment and Wages of Young Adults in Rural China

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  • Glewwe, Paul
  • Huang, Qiuqiong
  • Park, Albert

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to examine whether noncognitive skills explain differences in employment status and hourly wages even after controlling for age, experience, schooling and cognitive skills. Of particular interest is to examine the relative magnitudes of the impacts of the cognitive and noncognitive skills on these labor market outcomes. Data used in this paper come from the Gansu Survey of Children and Families (GSCF), which followed a random sample of 2,000 children in rural areas of Gansu Province who were 9-12 years old in the year 2000. Three waves of surveys were completed in 2000, 2004, and 2007-2009. The GSCF is the first large-scale data collection on child and adolescent cognitive and noncognitive skills in rural China.

Suggested Citation

  • Glewwe, Paul & Huang, Qiuqiong & Park, Albert, 2011. "Cognitive Skills, Non-Cognitive Skills, and the Employment and Wages of Young Adults in Rural China," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103407, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea11:103407
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/103407
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2008. "The Role of Cognitive Skills in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(3), pages 607-668, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cunningham, Wendy & Villasenor, Paula, 2014. "Employer voices, employer demands, and implications for public skills development policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6853, The World Bank.
    2. Jessica Leight & Elaine M. Liu, 2016. "Maternal Education, Parental Investment and Non-Cognitive Skills in Rural China," NBER Working Papers 22233, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Nordman, Christophe Jalil & Sarr, Leopold & Sharma, Smriti, 2015. "Cognitive, Non-Cognitive Skills and Gender Wage Gaps: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data in Bangladesh," IZA Discussion Papers 9132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Chih Ming Tan & Dhanushka Thamarapani, 2015. "The Impact of Sustained Attention on Labor Market Outcomes: The Case of Ghana," Working Paper series 15-32, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    5. Jessica Leight & Paul Glewwe & Albert Park, 2015. "The Impact of Early Childhood Rainfall Shocks on the Evolution of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-14, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Oct 2016.
    6. Jessica Leight & Elaine M. Liu, 2016. "Maternal Education, Parental Investment and Non-cognitive Characteristics in Rural China," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-05, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cognitive skills; noncognitive skills; years of schooling; wage; Gansu; China; International Development; Labor and Human Capital;

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