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Eating a Healthy Diet: Is Cost a Major Factor?

Author

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  • Carlson, Andrea
  • Lino, Mark
  • Fungwe, Thomas V.
  • Guenther, Patricia M.

Abstract

We examine the association between food expenditure and overall diet quality using a model where we assumed dietary quality is a function of health conditions, life style choices, total food expenditures, and socio-economic status. We use cross-sectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-02 and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion Food Prices Database. Diet quality is measured using the USDA Healthy Eating Index-2005. Our findings suggest that there is no statistically significant association between total diet quality and diet cost for men, but a small association for women. Compared with diet cost, health conditions, life style choices, and socio-economic status play an important role in determining diet quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlson, Andrea & Lino, Mark & Fungwe, Thomas V. & Guenther, Patricia M., 2009. "Eating a Healthy Diet: Is Cost a Major Factor?," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49259, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea09:49259
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/49259
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 617-650.
    2. Carlson, Andrea & Lino, Mark & Juan, WenYen & Hanson, Kenneth & Basiotis, P. Peter, 2007. "Thrifty Food Plan, 2006," CNPP Reports 42899, United States Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.
    3. Jaehong Park & George C. Davis, 2001. "The Theory and Econometrics of Health Information in Cross-Sectional Nutrient Demand Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 840-851.
    4. Abdulai, Awudu & Aubert, Dominique, 2004. "A cross-section analysis of household demand for food and nutrients in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 67-79, July.
    5. Carlson, Andrea & Lino, Mark & Fungwe, Thomas V., 2007. "The Low-Cost, Moderate-Cost, and Liberal Food Plans, 2007," CNPP Reports 45850, United States Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.
    6. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Frazao, Elizabeth & Guthrie, Joanne F., 1999. "Away-From-Home Foods Increasingly Important to Quality of American Diet," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33733, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Constructing Instruments for Regressions with Measurement Error when no Additional Data are Available, with an Application to Patents and R&D," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1201-1214, September.
    8. Carlos Arnade & Munisamy Gopinath, 2006. "The Dynamics of Individuals' Fat Consumption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(4), pages 836-850.
    9. Golan, Elise H. & Stewart, Hayden & Kuchler, Fred & Dong, Diansheng, 2008. "Can Low-Income Americans Afford a Healthy Diet?," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, November.
    10. Carlson, Andrea & Kinsey, Jean D. & Nadav, Carmel, 1998. "Who Eats What, When, And From Where?," Working Papers 14312, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
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