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Welfare Effects of Technological Convergence in the Food Industries

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  • Ruan, Jun
  • Gopinath, Munisamy
  • Buccola, Steven T.

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the welfare effects of technological convergence in the food industries. We extend Krugman's (1980) monopolistic competition model to allow for technological differences between two (groups of) countries. Technological convergence is reflected in a narrowing inter-country gap between fixed or marginal production cost, and the effects of convergence on output composition, factor rewards, trade pattern, and consumer welfare are derived. The theoretical predictions are examined and confirmed using an internationally comparable dataset.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruan, Jun & Gopinath, Munisamy & Buccola, Steven T., 2006. "Welfare Effects of Technological Convergence in the Food Industries," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21373, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea06:21373
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Agribusiness;

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