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Bayesian Analysis of Consumer Choices with Taste, Context, Reference Point and Individual Scale Effects

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  • Hu, Wuyang
  • Adamowicz, Wiktor L.
  • Veeman, Michele M.

Abstract

This paper adopts an approach based on the concepts of random utility maximization and builds on the general theoretical framework of Lancaster and on the conceptual and econometric innovations of McFadden. Recent research in this area explores models that account for context effects, as well as methods for characterizing heterogeneity, response variability and decision strategy selection by consumers. This makes it possible to construct much richer empirical models of individual consumer behavior. A Bayesian approach provides a useful way to estimate and interpret models that are difficult to accomplish by conventional maximization/minimization algorithms. The application reported in the paper involves analysis of reference dependence and product labeling as context effects and the assessment of heterogeneity and response variability.

Suggested Citation

  • Hu, Wuyang & Adamowicz, Wiktor L. & Veeman, Michele M., 2005. "Bayesian Analysis of Consumer Choices with Taste, Context, Reference Point and Individual Scale Effects," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19296, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea05:19296
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McFadden, Daniel, 1999. "Rationality for Economists?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 19(1-3), pages 73-105, December.
    2. Daniel Kahneman, 2003. "Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1449-1475, December.
    3. Charles F. Manski, 2000. "Economic Analysis of Social Interactions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 115-136, Summer.
    4. Elrod, Terry & Keane, Michael, 1995. "A Factor-Analytic Probit Model for Representing the Market Structure in Panel Data," MPRA Paper 52434, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Pagan,Adrian & Ullah,Aman, 1999. "Nonparametric Econometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521355643, April.
    6. Tülin Erdem & Michael P. Keane, 1996. "Decision-Making Under Uncertainty: Capturing Dynamic Brand Choice Processes in Turbulent Consumer Goods Markets," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 15(1), pages 1-20.
    7. Daniel McFadden, 2001. "Economic Choices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 351-378, June.
    8. Axel Börsch-Supan & Moshe Ben-Akiva & Kenneth Train & Daniel McFadden, 2002. "Hybrid Choice Models: Progress and Challenges," MEA discussion paper series 02009, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    9. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
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    11. Louviere, Jordan J, 2001. " What If Consumer Experiments Impact Variances as Well as Means? Response Variability as a Behavioral Phenomenon," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(3), pages 506-511, December.
    12. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
    13. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132-132.
    14. John A. List, 2004. "Neoclassical Theory Versus Prospect Theory: Evidence from the Marketplace," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(2), pages 615-625, March.
    15. Allenby, Greg M. & Rossi, Peter E., 1998. "Marketing models of consumer heterogeneity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1-2), pages 57-78, November.
    16. Hu, Wuyang & Adamowicz, Wiktor L. & Veeman, Michele M., 2004. "Decomposing Unobserved Choice Variability In The Presence Of Consumers' Taste Heterogeneity," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19954, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    17. Bera, Anil K. & Bilias, Yannis, 2002. "The MM, ME, ML, EL, EF and GMM approaches to estimation: a synthesis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 107(1-2), pages 51-86, March.
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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics;

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