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Fiscal policy and the real exchange rate: Some evidence from Spain

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Listed:
  • Oscar Bajo-Rubio

    () (Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha)

  • Burcu Berke

    () (Nigde University, Nigde, Turkey)

Abstract

The factors influencing the real exchange rate are an important issue for a country´s price competitiveness, which is especially relevant to those countries belonging to a monetary union. In this paper, we analyse the relationship between fiscal policy and the real exchange rate for the case of Spain. In particular, we explore how changes in government spending, differentiating between consumption and investment, can affect the long-run evolution of the real exchange rate vis-à-vis the euro area. The distinction between two alternative definitions of the real exchange rate, based on consumption price indices and export prices, respectively, will also prove to be crucial for the results.

Suggested Citation

  • Oscar Bajo-Rubio & Burcu Berke, 2014. "Fiscal policy and the real exchange rate: Some evidence from Spain," Working Papers 14-11, Asociación Española de Economía y Finanzas Internacionales.
  • Handle: RePEc:aee:wpaper:1411
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real exchange rate; Government consumption; Government investment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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