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Genetically modified cotton in Uganda: An ex ante evaluation

In: Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara

  • Horna, Daniela
  • Zambrano, Patricia
  • Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin
  • Sengooba, Theresa
  • Kyotalimye, Miriam

The Ugandan government has recognized the need to increase the per¬formance of cotton and the potential of crop biotechnologies, particu¬larly the role of genetically modified (GM) varieties to improve cotton production and thus the economy in general. In 2008, the National Biosafety Committee of Uganda approved the guidelines for implementing con¬fined trials, which enabled testing the environmental safety and performance of insect-resistant (Bt) and herbicide-tolerant (HT) cotton varieties. The implementation of the confined trials started in May 2009.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), 2013. "Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-795-1, May.
  • This item is provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI book chapters with number 9780896297951-03.
    Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifpric:9780896297951-03
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    1. Qaim, Matin, 2003. "Bt Cotton in India: Field Trial Results and Economic Projections," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 2115-2127, December.
    2. Svetlana Edmeades & Melinda Smale, 2006. "A trait-based model of the potential demand for a genetically engineered food crop in a developing economy," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 351-361, November.
    3. Hareau, Guy G. & Mills, Bradford F. & Norton, George W., 2006. "The potential benefits of herbicide-resistant transgenic rice in Uruguay: Lessons for small developing countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 162-179, April.
    4. Horna, Daniela & Smale, Melinda & Al-Hassan, Ramatu & Falck-Zepeda, José & Timpo, Samuel E., 2008. "Insecticide use on vegetables in Ghana: Would GM seed benefit farmers?," IFPRI discussion papers 785, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. De Groote, Hugo & Overholt, William & Ouma, James Okuro & Mugo, Stephen, 2003. "Assessing The Potential Impact Of Bt Maize In Kenya Using A Gis Based Model," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25854, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Jikun Huang & Ruifa Hu & Carl Pray & Fangbin Qiao & Scott Rozelle, 2003. "Biotechnology as an alternative to chemical pesticides: a case study of Bt cotton in China," CEMA Working Papers 509, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    7. David Tschirley & Colin Poulton & Patrick Labaste, 2009. "Organization and Performance of Cotton Sectors in Africa : Learning from Reform Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2604, September.
    8. Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Horna, J. Daniela & Smale, Melinda, 2008. "Betting on cotton: Potential payoffs and economic risks of adopting transgenic cotton in West Africa," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(2), September.
    9. Falck-Zepeda, Jose & Horna, Daniela & Smale, Melinda, 2007. "The economic impact and the distribution of benefits and risk from the adoption of insect resistant (Bt) cotton in West Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 718, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. José Benjamin Falck-Zepeda & Greg Traxler & Robert G. Nelson, 2000. "Surplus Distribution from the Introduction of a Biotechnology Innovation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 360-369.
    11. You, Liangzhi & Chamberlin, Jordan, 2004. "Spatial analysis of sustainable livelihood enterprises of Uganda cotton production:," EPTD discussion papers 121, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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