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Kelly Vosters

Personal Details

First Name:Kelly
Middle Name:
Last Name:Vosters
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvo301
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/kellynvosters/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Belk College of Business
University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Charlotte, North Carolina (United States)
http://www.belkcollege.uncc.edu/default.asp?id=67&objId=3
RePEc:edi:denccus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Brandén, Gunnar & Nybom, Martin & Vosters, Kelly, 2023. "Like Mother, like Child? The Rise of Women's Intergenerational Income Persistence in Sweden and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 16152, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Kelly Vosters & Jørgen Modalsli, 2019. "Spillover bias in multigenerational income regressions," Discussion Papers 897, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  3. Nybom, Martin & Vosters, Kelly, 2015. "Intergenerational Persistence in Latent Socioeconomic Status: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 3/2015, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

Articles

  1. Kelly Vosters, 2023. "Fuhrer, Jeff. The Myth That Made Us: How False Beliefs about Racism and Meritocracy Broke Our Economy (and How to Fix It)," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 61(4), pages 1583-1584, December.
  2. Vosters, Kelly N. & Guarino, Cassandra M. & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2018. "Understanding and evaluating the SAS® EVAAS® Univariate Response Model (URM) for measuring teacher effectiveness," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 191-205.
  3. Kelly Vosters, 2018. "Is the Simple Law of Mobility Really a Law? Testing Clark's Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 404-421, July.
  4. Kelly Vosters & Martin Nybom, 2017. "Intergenerational Persistence in Latent Socioeconomic Status: Evidence from Sweden and the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 869-901.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Kelly Vosters & Jørgen Modalsli, 2019. "Spillover bias in multigenerational income regressions," Discussion Papers 897, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Zachary Ward, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in American History: Accounting for Race and Measurement Error," CEH Discussion Papers 10, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Thomas van Huizen, 2021. "Teacher bias or measurement error bias? Evidence from track recommendations," Working Papers 2113, Utrecht School of Economics.
    3. Zafar, Rafia, 2022. "Intergenerational Mobility in Income and Consumption: Evidence from Indonesia," SocArXiv uzcfs, Center for Open Science.

  2. Nybom, Martin & Vosters, Kelly, 2015. "Intergenerational Persistence in Latent Socioeconomic Status: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 3/2015, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Sebastian Till Braun & Jan Stuhler, 2018. "The Transmission of Inequality Across Multiple Generations: Testing Recent Theories with Evidence from Germany," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(609), pages 576-611, March.
    2. Andra C. Ghent & Marianna Kudlyak, 2015. "Intergenerational Linkages in Household Credit," Working Paper 15-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    3. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten, 2019. "Dynastic Human Capital, Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 12300, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Vosters, Kelly N. & Guarino, Cassandra M. & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2018. "Understanding and evaluating the SAS® EVAAS® Univariate Response Model (URM) for measuring teacher effectiveness," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 191-205.

    Cited by:

    1. Goldhaber, Dan & Krieg, John & Theobald, Roddy, 2020. "Effective like me? Does having a more productive mentor improve the productivity of mentees?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    2. Audrey Amrein-Beardsley & Tray Geiger, 2020. "Methodological Concerns About the Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS): Validity, Reliability, and Bias," SAGE Open, , vol. 10(2), pages 21582440209, May.

  2. Kelly Vosters, 2018. "Is the Simple Law of Mobility Really a Law? Testing Clark's Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 404-421, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Matías Ciaschi & Mariana Marchionni & Guido Neidhöfer, 2021. "Intergenerational mobility in Latin America: the multiple facets of social status and the role of mothers," Asociación Argentina de Economía Política: Working Papers 4453, Asociación Argentina de Economía Política.
    2. Neidhöfer, Guido & Serrano, Joaquín & Gasparini, Leonardo, 2018. "Educational inequality and intergenerational mobility in Latin America: A new database," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 329-349.
    3. Santavirta, Torsten & Stuhler, Jan, 2024. "Name-Based Estimators of Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 16725, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Hsiu-Fen Hsu, 2021. "Intergenerational persistence in latent socioeconomic status: evidence from Taiwan," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 19(4), pages 753-772, December.
    5. Juliana Jaramillo-Echeverri, 2024. "Movilidad social en la educación: el caso de la Universidad de los Andes en Colombia entre 1949 y 2018," Cuadernos de Historia Económica 61, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    6. Sebastian Till Braun & Jan Stuhler, 2018. "The Transmission of Inequality Across Multiple Generations: Testing Recent Theories with Evidence from Germany," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(609), pages 576-611, March.
    7. Güell, Maia & Rodríguez Mora, José V & Solon, Gary, 2018. "New Directions in Measuring Intergenerational Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 12959, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Celhay, Pablo A. & Gallegos, Sebastian, 2023. "Educational Mobility Across Three Generations in Latin American Countries," Research Department working papers 1906, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.
    9. Marchionni Mariana & Berniell Inés & Gaspatini Leonardo & Viollaz Mariana, 2022. "The Role of Children and Work-from-Home in Gender Labor Market Asymmetries: Evidence from the COVID-19 Pandemic in Latin America," Asociación Argentina de Economía Política: Working Papers 4612, Asociación Argentina de Economía Política.
    10. Bonacini, Luca & Gallo, Giovanni & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2021. "Sometimes you cannot make it on your own. How household background influences chances of success in Italy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 832, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    11. Michele Bavaro & Federico Tullio, 2023. "Intergenerational mobility measurement with latent transition matrices," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 21(1), pages 25-45, March.
    12. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten, 2019. "Dynastic Human Capital, Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 12300, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Colagrossi, Marco & d'Hombres, Beatrice & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2019. "Like (Grand)Parent, like Child? Multigenerational Mobility across the EU," IZA Discussion Papers 12302, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Paul Hufe & Andreas Peichl & Daniel Weishaar, 2018. "Intergenerational Income Stability: Is Germany Lagging Behind?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 71(20), pages 20-28, October.
    15. Ulrika Ahrsjö & René Karadakic & Joachim Kahr Rasmussen, 2021. "Intergenerational Mobility Trends and the Changing Role of Female Labor," CEBI working paper series 21-19, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).

  3. Kelly Vosters & Martin Nybom, 2017. "Intergenerational Persistence in Latent Socioeconomic Status: Evidence from Sweden and the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 869-901.

    Cited by:

    1. Ahsan,Md. Nazmul & Emran,M. Shahe & Jiang,Hanchen & Han,Qingyang & Shilpi,Forhad J., 2023. "Growing Up Together : Sibling Correlation, Parental Influence, and IntergenerationalEducational Mobility in Developing Countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 10285, The World Bank.
    2. Amaral, Ernesto F. L. & Yen, Shih-Keng & Wang, Sharron Xuanren, 2019. "A meta-analysis of the association between income inequality and intergenerational mobility," OSF Preprints 8qmhw, Center for Open Science.
    3. Neidhöfer, Guido & Serrano, Joaquín & Gasparini, Leonardo, 2018. "Educational inequality and intergenerational mobility in Latin America: A new database," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 329-349.
    4. Santavirta, Torsten & Stuhler, Jan, 2024. "Name-Based Estimators of Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 16725, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Hsiu-Fen Hsu, 2021. "Intergenerational persistence in latent socioeconomic status: evidence from Taiwan," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 19(4), pages 753-772, December.
    6. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2019. "Economic approach to intergenerational mobility: Measures, methods, and challenges in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-98, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Güell, Maia & Rodríguez Mora, José V & Solon, Gary, 2018. "New Directions in Measuring Intergenerational Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 12959, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Martin Nybom & Jan Stuhler, 2019. "Steady-state assumptions in intergenerational mobility research," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 17(1), pages 77-97, March.
    9. Brandén, Gunnar & Nybom, Martin & Vosters, Kelly, 2023. "Like Mother, like Child? The Rise of Women's Intergenerational Income Persistence in Sweden and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 16152, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Nybom, Martin & Stuhler, Jan, 2021. "Intergenerational mobility in a recession: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 2021:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    11. M Dolores Collado & Ignacio Ortuño-Ortín & Jan Stuhler, 2023. "Estimating Intergenerational and Assortative Processes in Extended Family Data," The Review of Economic Studies, Review of Economic Studies Ltd, vol. 90(3), pages 1195-1227.
    12. Ulrika Ahrsjo & Ren'e Karadakic & Joachim Kahr Rasmussen, 2023. "Intergenerational Mobility Trends and the Changing Role of Female Labor," Papers 2302.14440, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2023.
    13. Bonacini, Luca & Gallo, Giovanni & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2021. "Sometimes you cannot make it on your own. How household background influences chances of success in Italy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 832, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    14. Michele Bavaro & Federico Tullio, 2023. "Intergenerational mobility measurement with latent transition matrices," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 21(1), pages 25-45, March.
    15. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten, 2019. "Dynastic Human Capital, Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 12300, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Colagrossi, Marco & d'Hombres, Beatrice & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2019. "Like (Grand)Parent, like Child? Multigenerational Mobility across the EU," IZA Discussion Papers 12302, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Ulrika Ahrsjö & René Karadakic & Joachim Kahr Rasmussen, 2021. "Intergenerational Mobility Trends and the Changing Role of Female Labor," CEBI working paper series 21-19, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2019-03-04 2023-07-10. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2019-03-04. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty (1) 2023-07-10. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MFD: Microfinance (1) 2023-07-10. Author is listed

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