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Patrick Van Horn

Personal Details

First Name:Patrick
Middle Name:
Last Name:Van Horn
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pva512
https://patrickvanhorn.net
Terminal Degree:2007 Department of Economics; University of California-Irvine (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics and Business
Southwestern University

Georgetown, Texas (United States)
http://www.southwestern.edu/departments/economicsbusiness/
RePEc:edi:deswuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Christoffer Koch & Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2020. "Countercyclical Capital Buffers: A Cautionary Tale," NBER Working Papers 26710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2011. "In the Eye of a Storm: Manhattan's Money Center Banks During the International Financial Crisis of 1931," NBER Working Papers 17437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2008. "Intensified Regulatory Scrutiny and Bank Distress in New York City During the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 14120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2007. "Fetters of Debt, Deposit, or Gold during the Great Depression? The International Propagation of the Banking Crisis of 1931," NBER Working Papers 12983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Richardson, Gary & Van Horn, Patrick, 2009. "Intensified Regulatory Scrutiny and Bank Distress in New York City During the Great Depression," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(2), pages 446-465, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Christoffer Koch & Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2020. "Countercyclical Capital Buffers: A Cautionary Tale," NBER Working Papers 26710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Raphael Auer & Alexandra Matyunina & Steven Ongena, 2021. "The countercyclical capital buffer and the composition of bank lending," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 21-66, Swiss Finance Institute.
    2. Martínez, J-F. & Peiris, M.U. & Tsomocos, D.P., 2020. "Macroprudential policy analysis in an estimated DSGE model with a heterogeneous banking system: An application to Chile," Latin American Journal of Central Banking (previously Monetaria), Elsevier, vol. 1(1).
    3. Simon, Luis, 2021. "Capital requirements in a model of bank runs: The 2008 run on repo," Latin American Journal of Central Banking (previously Monetaria), Elsevier, vol. 2(3).

  2. Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2011. "In the Eye of a Storm: Manhattan's Money Center Banks During the International Financial Crisis of 1931," NBER Working Papers 17437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Kris James Mitchener & Gary Richardson, 2016. "Network Contagion and Interbank Amplification during the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 22074, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Olivier Accominotti, 2019. "International banking and transmission of the 1931 financial crisis," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 260-285, February.
    3. Breitenlechner, Max & Mathy, Gabriel P. & Scharler, Johann, 2021. "Decomposing the U.S. Great Depression: How important were loan supply shocks?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    4. Matthew S. Jaremski & David C. Wheelock, 2019. "The Founding of the Federal Reserve, the Great Depression and the Evolution of the U.S. Interbank Network," NBER Working Papers 26034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2008. "Intensified Regulatory Scrutiny and Bank Distress in New York City During the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 14120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Accominotti, Olivier, 2012. "London Merchant Banks, the Central European Panic, and the Sterling Crisis of 1931," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 1-43, March.
    2. Eric Monnet & Francois R. Velde, 2020. "Money, Banking, and Old-School Historical Economics," Working Paper Series WP-2020-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    3. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz, 2010. "Crisis? What Crisis? Currency vs. Banking in the Financial Crisis of 1931," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2010-014, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    4. Olivier Accominotti, 2019. "International banking and transmission of the 1931 financial crisis," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 260-285, February.
    5. Adam, Marc Christopher, 2020. "Liquidating bankers' acceptances: International crisis, doctrinal conflict and American exceptionalism in the Federal Reserve 1913-1932," Discussion Papers 2020/4, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    6. Olivier ACCOMINOTTI & Marie BRIERE & Aurore BURIETZ & Kim OOSTERLINCK & Ariane SZAFARZ, 2020. "Did Globalization Kill Contagion?," Working Papers 2020-ACF-01, IESEG School of Management.
    7. Richardson, Gary & Van Horn, Patrick, 2018. "In the eye of a Storm: Manhattan's money center banks during the international financial crisis of 1931," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 71-94.
    8. Robert L. Hetzel & Gary Richardson, 2016. "Money, Banking, and Monetary Policy from the Formation of the Federal Reserve until Today," Working Paper 16-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    9. Mark Billings & Forrest Capie, 2011. "Financial crisis, contagion, and the British banking system between the world wars," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(2), pages 193-215.
    10. Haelim Park & Patrick Van Horn, 2015. "Did the Reserve Requirement Increases of 1936–37 Reduce Bank Lending? Evidence from a Quasi‐Experiment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(5), pages 791-818, August.
    11. Christoffer Koch & Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2016. "Bank Leverage and Regulatory Regimes: Evidence from the Great Depression and Great Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 538-542, May.
    12. Price Fishback, 2010. "US monetary and fiscal policy in the 1930s," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 385-413, Autumn.
    13. Sergi Basco & John P. Tang, 2021. "Banks, Credit Supply, and the Life Cycle of Firms: Theory and Evidence from Late Nineteenth Century Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 02, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    14. Robert William Fogel & Enid M. Fogel & Mark Guglielmo & Nathaniel Grotte, 2013. "Acknowledgments, References, Index," NBER Chapters, in: Political Arithmetic: Simon Kuznets and the Empirical Tradition in Economics, pages 119-148, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz, 2014. "Currency Versus Banking In The Financial Crisis Of 1931," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55(2), pages 349-373, May.
    16. Haelim Park Anderson & Gary Richardson & Brian S. Yang, 2017. "Deposit Insurance and Depositor Monitoring: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from the Creation of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation," NBER Working Papers 23828, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2007. "Fetters of Debt, Deposit, or Gold during the Great Depression? The International Propagation of the Banking Crisis of 1931," NBER Working Papers 12983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel P. Mathy & Christopher M. Meissner, 2011. "Trade, Exchange Rate Regimes and Output Co-Movement: Evidence from the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 16925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Richardson, Gary & Van Horn, Patrick, 2009. "Intensified Regulatory Scrutiny and Bank Distress in New York City During the Great Depression," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(2), pages 446-465, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (5) 2007-03-31 2008-07-05 2011-09-22 2016-07-16 2020-02-17. Author is listed
  2. NEP-BAN: Banking (3) 2007-03-31 2008-07-05 2020-02-17
  3. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (3) 2007-03-31 2011-09-22 2020-02-17
  4. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2016-07-16 2020-02-17
  5. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2016-07-16
  6. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2020-02-17
  7. NEP-IFN: International Finance (1) 2011-09-22

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