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Peter Gerard Troyan Jr.

Personal Details

First Name:Peter
Middle Name:Gerard
Last Name:Troyan
Suffix:Jr.
RePEc Short-ID:ptr251
http://people.virginia.edu/~pgt8y

Affiliation

(66%) Department of Economics
University of Virginia

Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)
http://www.virginia.edu/economics/

: (434)-924-3177
(434)-982-2904
P.O. Box 400182, Charlottesville, Va. 22904-4182
RePEc:edi:deuvaus (more details at EDIRC)

(34%) Department of Economics
Stanford University

Stanford, California (United States)
https://economics.stanford.edu/

: (650)-725-3266
(650)-725-5702
Ralph Landau Economics Building, Stanford, CA 94305-6072
RePEc:edi:destaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Peter Troyan, 2011. "Comparing School Choice Mechanisms by Interim and Ex-Ante Welfare," Discussion Papers 10-021, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

Articles

  1. Troyan, Peter, 2012. "Comparing school choice mechanisms by interim and ex-ante welfare," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 936-947.
  2. Fuhito Kojima & Peter Troyan, 2011. "Matching And Market Design: An Introduction To Selected Topics," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 82-98, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Peter Troyan, 2011. "Comparing School Choice Mechanisms by Interim and Ex-Ante Welfare," Discussion Papers 10-021, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Wonki Jo Cho & Battal Doğan, 2017. "Stability and the immediate acceptance rule when school priorities are weak," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 46(4), pages 991-1014, November.
    2. Mustafa Og̃uz Afacan & Zeynel Harun Aliog̃ulları & Mehmet Barlo, 2017. "Sticky matching in school choice," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 64(3), pages 509-538, October.
    3. Caterina Calsamiglia & Chao Fu & Maia Güell, 2014. "Structural Estimation of a Model of School Choices: the Boston Mechanism vs. Its Alternatives," Working Papers 811, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Fragiadakis, Daniel & Troyan, Peter, 2017. "Improving matching under hard distributional constraints," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(2), May.
    5. Featherstone, Clayton R. & Niederle, Muriel, 2016. "Boston versus deferred acceptance in an interim setting: An experimental investigation," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 353-375.
    6. Nikhil Agarwal & Paulo Somaini, 2014. "Demand Analysis using Strategic Reports: An application to a school choice mechanism," NBER Working Papers 20775, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Afacan, Mustafa Oǧuz, 2016. "Enrollment manipulations in school choice," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 119-125.
    8. He, Yinghua & Miralles, Antonio & Pycia, Marek & Yan, Jianye, 2015. "A Pseudo-Market Approach to Allocation with Priorities," TSE Working Papers 15-601, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Jul 2017.

Articles

  1. Troyan, Peter, 2012. "Comparing school choice mechanisms by interim and ex-ante welfare," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 936-947.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Fuhito Kojima & Peter Troyan, 2011. "Matching And Market Design: An Introduction To Selected Topics," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 82-98, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Biro & Flip Klijn, 2011. "Matching with Couples: a Multidisciplinary Survey," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1139, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

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