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Maria Stanfors

Personal Details

First Name:Maria
Middle Name:
Last Name:Stanfors
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst552
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(50%) Ekonomisk-historiska Institutionen
Ekonomihögskolan
Lunds Universitet

Lund, Sweden
http://www.ekh.lu.se/

: +46 46-222 00 00
+46 46-13 15 85
Box 7083, 220 07 Lund
RePEc:edi:dhlunse (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Ekonomihögskolan
Lunds Universitet

Lund, Sweden
http://www.ehl.lu.se/

: +46 46-222 32 61
+46 46-222 34 06
P. O. Box 7080, SE-220 07 Lund
RePEc:edi:ehlunse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Karlsson, Tobias & Stanfors, Maria, 2016. "To be or not to be? Risk attitudes and gender differences in union membership," Lund Papers in Economic History 144, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
  2. Eriksson, Björn & Stanfors, Maria, 2014. "A Winning Strategy? The employment of women and firm longevity during industrialization," Lund Papers in Economic History 136, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
  3. Stanfors, Maria & Burnette, Joyce, 2012. "Before Careers: Experiences of Wage Growth among Late Nineteenth-Century Swedish Cigar Workers," Lund Papers in Economic History 121, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
  4. Björn Erikssoon & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2012. "Sexism at work," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 385, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2011. "Gender, Productivity and the Nature of Work and Pay: Evidence from the Late Nineteenth-Century Tobacco Industry," CEP Discussion Papers dp1053, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

Articles

  1. Björn Eriksson & Maria Stanfors, 2015. "A winning strategy? The employment of women and firm longevity during industrialisation," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 57(7), pages 988-1004, October.
  2. Maria Stanfors & Joyce Burnette, 2015. "Estimating Historical Wage Profiles," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 35-51, March.
  3. Maria Stanfors & Tim Leunig & Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson, 2014. "Gender, productivity, and the nature of work and pay: evidence from the late nineteenth-century tobacco industry," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(1), pages 48-65, February.
  4. Maria Stanfors, 2014. "Fertility and the fast-track," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(15), pages 421-458, August.
  5. Martin Dribe & Maria Stanfors, 2010. "Family life in power couples," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(30), pages 847-878, November.
  6. Martin Dribe & Maria Stanfors, 2009. "Education, Work and Parenthood: Comparing the Experience of Young Men and Women in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 32-42, March.
  7. Maria Stanfors, 2006. "Labor Force Transitions after Childbirth Among Five Birth Cohorts in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 287-309, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson & Tim Leunig & Maria Stanfors, 2011. "Gender, Productivity and the Nature of Work and Pay: Evidence from the Late Nineteenth-Century Tobacco Industry," CEP Discussion Papers dp1053, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Eriksson, Björn & Stanfors, Maria, 2014. "A Winning Strategy? The employment of women and firm longevity during industrialization," Lund Papers in Economic History 136, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    2. Karlsson, Tobias & Stanfors, Maria, 2016. "To be or not to be? Risk attitudes and gender differences in union membership," Lund Papers in Economic History 144, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

Articles

  1. Maria Stanfors & Tim Leunig & Björn Eriksson & Tobias Karlsson, 2014. "Gender, productivity, and the nature of work and pay: evidence from the late nineteenth-century tobacco industry," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(1), pages 48-65, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Maria Stanfors, 2014. "Fertility and the fast-track," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(15), pages 421-458, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard Stjärnfäldt, 2016. "Are Parents More Likely to Be Unemployed? A Study of Nine Western Democracies," LIS Working papers 685, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.

  3. Martin Dribe & Maria Stanfors, 2010. "Family life in power couples," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(30), pages 847-878, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Katia Begall, 2013. "How do educational and occupational resources relate to the timing of family formation? A couple analysis of the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(34), pages 907-936, October.
    2. Linda Kridahl, 2017. "Retirement timing and grandparenthood: A population-based study on Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(31), pages 957-994, October.
    3. Jan Van Bavel, 2014. "The mid-twentieth century Baby Boom and the changing educational gradient in Belgian cohort fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(33), pages 925-962, March.
    4. Anja Oppermann, 2012. "A New Color in the Picture: The Impact of Educational Fields on Fertility in Western Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 496, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Maria Stanfors, 2014. "Fertility and the fast-track," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(15), pages 421-458, August.
    6. Marika Jalovaara & Anneli Miettinen, 2013. "Does his paycheck also matter?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(31), pages 881-916, April.
    7. Liat Raz-Yurovich, 2011. "Economic determinants of divorce among dual-earner couples: Jews in Israel," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    8. Boschini, Anne & Håkanson, Christina & Rosén, Åsa & Sjögren, Anna, 2011. "Trading off or having it all? Completed fertility and mid-career earnings of Swedish men and women," Working Paper Series 2011:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

  4. Martin Dribe & Maria Stanfors, 2009. "Education, Work and Parenthood: Comparing the Experience of Young Men and Women in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 32-42, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Suwen Pan & Cheng Fang & Roderick Rejesus, 2009. "Food Calorie Intake under Grain Price Uncertainty in Rural Nepal," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 137-148, June.
    2. Kravdal, Øystein & Rindfuss, Ronald R., 2007. "Changing relationships between education and fertility – a study of women and men born 1940-64," Memorandum 11/2007, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    3. Alejandro Cid & Charles Stokes, 2013. "Family Structure and Children’s Education Outcome: Evidence from Uruguay," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 185-199, June.
    4. Karina Shreffler & Amy Pirretti & Robert Drago, 2010. "Work–Family Conflict and Fertility Intentions: Does Gender Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 228-240, June.
    5. Seong-Hoon Cho & Dayton Lambert & Hyun Kim & Seung Kim, 2009. "Overweight Korean Adolescents and Academic Achievement," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 126-136, June.
    6. Helen Peterson & Kristina Engwall, 2016. "Missing Out on the Parenthood Bonus? Voluntarily Childless in a “Child-friendly” Society," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 540-552, December.
    7. Nan Astone & Jacinda Dariotis & Freya Sonenstein & Joseph Pleck & Kathryn Hynes, 2010. "Men’s Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 3-13, March.
    8. Luigi Aldieri & Adriana Barone & Concetto Paolo Vinci, 2006. "Human capital and fertility decisions in Italy: a microeconometric analysis of ECHP data," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 49(4), pages 281-292.
    9. Øystein Kravdal, 2007. "Effects of current education on second- and third-birth rates among Norwegian women and men born in 1964: Substantive interpretations and methodological issues," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(9), pages 211-246, November.
    10. Alejandro Cid & Charles E. Stokes, 2011. "Family Structural Influences on Children’s Education Attainment:Evidence from Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo/Working Papers 1103, Facultad de Ciencias Empresariales y Economia. Universidad de Montevideo..
    11. Boschini, Anne & Håkanson, Christina & Rosén, Åsa & Sjögren, Anna, 2011. "Trading off or having it all? Completed fertility and mid-career earnings of Swedish men and women," Working Paper Series 2011:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

  5. Maria Stanfors, 2006. "Labor Force Transitions after Childbirth Among Five Birth Cohorts in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 287-309, June.

    Cited by:

    1. George Hondroyiannis, 2010. "Fertility Determinants and Economic Uncertainty: An Assessment Using European Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-50, March.
    2. Helen Peterson & Kristina Engwall, 2016. "Missing Out on the Parenthood Bonus? Voluntarily Childless in a “Child-friendly” Society," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 540-552, December.
    3. Akinori Tomohara & Ho Lee, 2007. "Did State Children’s Health Insurance Program Affect Married Women’s Labor Supply?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 668-683, December.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07 2016-03-29
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07
  3. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2011-06-11 2013-01-07
  4. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-01-07
  5. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2011-06-11

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