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Isaac Sorkin

Personal Details

First Name:Isaac
Middle Name:
Last Name:Sorkin
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pso437
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/isaacsorkin/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Stanford University

Stanford, California (United States)
https://economics.stanford.edu/

: (650)-725-3266
(650)-725-5702
Ralph Landau Economics Building, Stanford, CA 94305-6072
RePEc:edi:destaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Software

Working papers

  1. Aaron B. Flaaen & Matthew D. Shapiro & Isaac Sorkin, 2017. "Reconsidering the Consequences of Worker Displacements: Firm versus Worker Perspective," NBER Working Papers 24077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Isaac Sorkin, 2016. "Ranking Firms Using Revealed Preference," 2016 Meeting Papers 66, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Aaronson, Daniel & French, Eric Baird & Sorkin, Isaac, 2016. "Industry Dynamics and the Minimum Wage: A Putty-Clay Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 11097, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. Isaac Sorkin, 2017. "The Role of Firms in Gender Earnings Inequality: Evidence from the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 384-387, May.
  2. Sorkin, Isaac, 2016. "What Does the Changing Sectoral Composition of the Economy Mean for Workers?," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Isaac Sorkin, 2015. "Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 306-333, April.

Software components

  1. Isaac Sorkin, 2014. "Code and data files for "Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?"," Computer Codes 13-225, Review of Economic Dynamics.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Isaac Sorkin, 2016. "Ranking Firms Using Revealed Preference," 2016 Meeting Papers 66, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Alexandre Mas & Amanda Pallais, 2017. "Valuing Alternative Work Arrangements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(12), pages 3722-3759, December.
    2. Hall, Robert & Mueller, Andreas I., 2015. "Wage Dispersion and Search Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 9527, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Niklas Engbom & Christian Moser, 2017. "Earnings Inequality and the Minimum Wage: Evidence from Brazil," CESifo Working Paper Series 6393, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Pessoa de Araujo, Ana Luisa, 2017. "Wage Inequality and Job Stability," Working Papers 5, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute.
    5. David Card & Ana Rute Cardoso & Jörg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2017. "Firms and Labor Market Inequality: Evidence and Some Theory," Working Papers 976, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    6. Christopher Taber & Rune Vejlin, 2016. "Estimation of a Roy/Search/Compensating Differential Model of the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 22439, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Robert E. Hall & Andreas I. Mueller, 2015. "Wage Dispersion and Search Behavior: The Importance of Non-Wage Job Values," NBER Working Papers 21764, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Stéphane Bonhomme & Thibaut Lamadon & Elena Manresa, 2017. "Discretizing unobserved heterogeneity," IFS Working Papers W17/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Aaron B. Flaaen & Matthew D. Shapiro & Isaac Sorkin, 2017. "Reconsidering the Consequences of Worker Displacements: Firm versus Worker Perspective," NBER Working Papers 24077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Isaac Sorkin, 2017. "The Role of Firms in Gender Earnings Inequality: Evidence from the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 384-387, May.
    11. Bonhomme, Stéphane & Lamadon, Thibaut & Manresa, Elena, 2017. "Discretizing Unobserved Heterogeneity," Working Paper Series 2017:21, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    12. Taber, Christopher & Vejlin, Rune Majlund, 2016. "Estimation of a Roy/Search/Compensating Differential Model of the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 9975, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. John Haltiwanger & Henry Hyatt & Lisa B. Kahn & Erika McEntarfer, 2017. "Cyclical Job Ladders by Firm Size and Firm Wage," NBER Working Papers 23485, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Aaronson, Daniel & French, Eric Baird & Sorkin, Isaac, 2016. "Industry Dynamics and the Minimum Wage: A Putty-Clay Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 11097, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Dara Lee Luca & Michael Luca, 2017. "Survival of the Fittest: The Impact of the Minimum Wage on Firm Exit," Harvard Business School Working Papers 17-088, Harvard Business School, revised Mar 2018.
    2. Michael R. Strain & Jeffrey Clemens, 2017. "Estimating the employment effects of recent minimum wage changes: Early evidence, an interpretative framework, and a pre-commitment to future analysis," AEI Economics Working Papers 914893, American Enterprise Institute.
    3. Aaronson, Daniel & Phelan, Brian J., 2017. "Wage Shocks and the Technological Substitution of Low-Wage Job," Working Paper Series WP-2017-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

Articles

  1. Isaac Sorkin, 2017. "The Role of Firms in Gender Earnings Inequality: Evidence from the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 384-387, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Dostie, Benoit & Javdani, Mohsen, 2017. "Not for the Profit, but for the Training? Gender Differences in Training in the For-Profit and Non-Profit Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 11108, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Isaac Sorkin, 2015. "Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 306-333, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Clemens, 2015. "The Minimum Wage and the Great Recession: Evidence from the Current Population Survey," NBER Working Papers 21830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Michael R. Strain & Peter Brummund, 2016. "Real and permanent minimum wages," AEI Economics Working Papers 875967, American Enterprise Institute.
    3. Adam M. Lavecchia, 2018. "Minimum Wage Policy with Optimal Taxes and Unemployment," Working Papers 1801E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    4. Bell, Brian & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "Minimum wages and firm value," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66415, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Katharine G. Abraham & Melissa S. Kearney, 2018. "Explaining the Decline in the U.S. Employment-to-Population Ratio: A Review of the Evidence," NBER Working Papers 24333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Lordan, Grace & Neumark, David, 2017. "People versus machines: the impact of minimum wages on automatable," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 84060, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Aaronson, Daniel & French, Eric Baird & Sorkin, Isaac, 2016. "Industry Dynamics and the Minimum Wage: A Putty-Clay Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 11097, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Lordan, Grace & Neumark, David, 2018. "People versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs," IZA Discussion Papers 11297, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Constantin Anghelache & Madalina – Gabriela Anghel & Alina – Georgiana Solomon, 2017. "The Effect of Migration on Labor Resources," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 7(3), pages 6-13, July.
    10. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2017. "The Minimum Wage and the Great Recession: A Response to Zipperer and Recapitulation of the Evidence," MPRA Paper 80153, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Aaronson, Daniel & French, Eric & Sorkin, Isaac, 2013. "Firm Dynamics and the Minimum Wage: A Putty-Clay Approach," Working Paper Series WP-2013-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    12. George Economides & Thomas Moutos, 2016. "Can Minimum Wages Raise Workers' Incomes in the Long Run?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5913, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. David Pence Slichter, 2015. "The Employment Effects of the Minimum Wage: A Selection Ratio Approach to Measuring Treatment Effects," 2015 Papers psl76, Job Market Papers.
    14. Michael R. Strain & Jeffrey Clemens, 2017. "Estimating the employment effects of recent minimum wage changes: Early evidence, an interpretative framework, and a pre-commitment to future analysis," AEI Economics Working Papers 914893, American Enterprise Institute.
    15. Vera Bitsch & Stefan Mair & Marta M. Borucinska & Christiane A. Schettler, 2017. "Introduction of a Nationwide Minimum Wage: Challenges to Agribusinesses in Germany," ECONOMIA AGRO-ALIMENTARE, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 19(1), pages 13-34.
    16. John Horton, 2017. "Price Floors and Employer Preferences: Evidence from a Minimum Wage Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 6548, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Aaronson, Daniel & Phelan, Brian J., 2017. "Wage Shocks and the Technological Substitution of Low-Wage Job," Working Paper Series WP-2017-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    18. David Neumark, 2017. "The Employment Effects of Minimum Wages: Some Questions We Need to Answer," NBER Working Papers 23584, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Doruk Cengiz & Arindrajit Dube & Attila Lindner & Ben Zipperer, 2018. "The Effect of Minimum Wages on Low-Wage Jobs: Evidence from the United States Using a Bunching Estimator," CEP Discussion Papers dp1531, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    20. Clemens, Jeffrey & Strain, Michael R., 2018. "Minimum Wage Analysis Using a Pre-Committed Research Design: Evidence through 2016," IZA Discussion Papers 11427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Software components

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More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2016-02-29 2017-10-29 2017-12-18. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2016-02-29 2017-12-18. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2017-10-29. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2017-10-29. Author is listed

Corrections

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