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Granular Search, Market Structure, and Wages

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  • Jarosch, Gregor
  • Nimczik, Jan Sebastian
  • Sorkin, Isaac

Abstract

We build a model where firm size is a source of labor market power. The key mechanism is that a granular employer can eliminate its own vacancies from a worker's outside option in the wage bargain. Hence, a granular employer does not compete with itself. We show how wages depend on employment concentration and then use the model to quantify the effects of granular market power. In Austrian micro-data, we find that granular market power depresses wages by about ten percent and can explain 40 percent of the observed decline in the labor share from 1997 to 2015. Mergers decrease competition for workers and reduce wages even at non-merging firms.

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  • Jarosch, Gregor & Nimczik, Jan Sebastian & Sorkin, Isaac, 2019. "Granular Search, Market Structure, and Wages," CEPR Discussion Papers 14231, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14231
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    Cited by:

    1. Marinescu, Ioana & Ouss, Ivan & Pape, Louis-Daniel, 2021. "Wages, hires, and labor market concentration," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 506-605.
    2. Federico Huneeus & Kory Kroft & Kevin Lim, 2021. "Earnings Inequality in Production Networks," NBER Working Papers 28424, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Fernández-Villaverde, Jesús & Mandelman, Federico & Yu, Yang & Zanetti, Francesco, 2021. "The “Matthew effect” and market concentration: Search complementarities and monopsony power," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 62-90.
    4. Aldunate, Felipe & González, Felipe & Prem, Mounu & Urzúa, Francisco, 2020. "Privatization and business groups: Evidence from the Chicago Boys in Chile," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    5. Vladimír Peciar, 2021. "Empirical investigation into market power, markups and employment," MUNI ECON Working Papers 2021-03, Masaryk University.
    6. David Berger & Kyle Herkenhoff & Simon Mongey, 2018. "Labor Market Power," 2018 Meeting Papers 170, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Monica Costa Dias & Ella Johnson-Watts & Robert Joyce & Fabien Postel-Vinay & Peter Spittal & Xiaowei Xu, 2021. "Worker Mobility and Labour Market Opportunities," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 21/753, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    8. Ihsaan Bassier & Arindrajit Dube & Suresh Naidu, 2020. "Monopsony in Movers: The Elasticity of Labor Supply to Firm Wage Policies," NBER Working Papers 27755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Alan Manning, 2021. "Monopsony in Labor Markets: A Review," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 74(1), pages 3-26, January.
    10. Kevin Rinz, 2019. "Did Timing Matter? Life Cycle Differences in Effects of Exposure to the Great Recession," Working Papers 19-25, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    11. Zhuravleva, Nadezhda, 2021. "How Bad Is Labor Market Concentration?: Evidence From Soviet (Urban) Satellites," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242405, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets

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