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Luke Sibieta

Personal Details

First Name:Luke
Middle Name:
Last Name:Sibieta
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psi518
http://www.ifs.org.uk/people/profile/208

Affiliation

(50%) ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP)
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ifs.org.uk/centres/cpp/

: +44 (0)20 7291 4800
+44 (0)20 7323 4780
7 Ridgmount Street, London WC1E 7AE
RePEc:edi:cfifsuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ifs.org.uk/

: (+44) (020) 7291 4800
(+44) (020) 7323 4780
7 Ridgmount Street, London WC1E 7AE
RePEc:edi:ifsssuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ellen Greaves & Luke Sibieta, 2014. "Estimating the effect of teacher pay on pupil attainment using boundary discontinuities," IFS Working Papers W14/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  2. Lorraine Dearden & Luke Sibieta & Kathy Sylva, 2011. "The socio-economic gradient in early child outcomes: evidence from the Millennium Cohort Study," IFS Working Papers W11/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Lorraine Dearden & Chris Ryan & Luke Sibieta, 2010. "What determines private school choice? a comparison between the UK and Australia," IFS Working Papers W10/22, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  4. Richard Blundell & Lorraine Dearden & Luke Sibieta, 2010. "The demand for private schooling in England: the impact of price and quality," IFS Working Papers W10/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Mike Brewer & James Browne & Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2010. "Child poverty in the UK since 1998-99: lessons from the past decade," IFS Working Papers W10/23, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Articles

  1. Mike Brewer & James Browne & Andrew Hood & Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2013. "The Short‐ and Medium‐Term Impacts of the Recession on the UK Income Distribution," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 179-201, June.
  2. Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2013. "An assessment of Labour’s record on income inequality and poverty," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 178-202, SPRING.
  3. Lorraine Dearden & Chris Ryan & Luke Sibieta, 2011. "What Determines Private School Choice? A Comparison between the United Kingdom and Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(3), pages 308-320, September.
  4. Chris Ryan & Luke Sibieta, 2011. "A Comparison of Private Schooling in the United Kingdom and Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(3), pages 295-307, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ellen Greaves & Luke Sibieta, 2014. "Estimating the effect of teacher pay on pupil attainment using boundary discontinuities," IFS Working Papers W14/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Sander Gerritsen & Sonny Kuijpers & Marc van der Steeg, 2015. "The effects of higher teacher pay on teacher retention," CPB Discussion Paper 316, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

  2. Lorraine Dearden & Luke Sibieta & Kathy Sylva, 2011. "The socio-economic gradient in early child outcomes: evidence from the Millennium Cohort Study," IFS Working Papers W11/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark McGovern, 2011. "Still unequal at birth - birth weight, socioeconomic status and outcomes at age 9," Working Papers 201125, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    2. Lay-Yee, Roy & Milne, Barry & Davis, Peter & Pearson, Janet & McLay, Jessica, 2015. "Determinants and disparities: A simulation approach to the case of child health care," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 202-211.
    3. Francesca Foliano & Francis Green & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Can Talented Pupils with Low Socio-economic Status Shine? Evidence from a Boarding School," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    4. Pearce, Anna & Sawyer, Alyssa C.P. & Chittleborough, Catherine R. & Mittinty, Murthy N. & Law, Catherine & Lynch, John W., 2016. "Do early life cognitive ability and self-regulation skills explain socio-economic inequalities in academic achievement? An effect decomposition analysis in UK and Australian cohorts," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 108-118.
    5. Samantha Parsons & Lucinda Platt, 2014. "Disabled children's cognitive development in the early years," DoQSS Working Papers 14-15, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.

  3. Lorraine Dearden & Chris Ryan & Luke Sibieta, 2010. "What determines private school choice? a comparison between the UK and Australia," IFS Working Papers W10/22, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. John Glen & Joseph G. Nellis, 2010. "“The Price You Pay”: The Impact of State-Funded Secondary School Performance on Residential Property Values in England," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 57(4), pages 405-428, December.

  4. Mike Brewer & James Browne & Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2010. "Child poverty in the UK since 1998-99: lessons from the past decade," IFS Working Papers W10/23, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Robert Joyce, 2015. "Child poverty in Britain: recent trends and future prospects," IFS Working Papers W15/07, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Articles

  1. Mike Brewer & James Browne & Andrew Hood & Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2013. "The Short‐ and Medium‐Term Impacts of the Recession on the UK Income Distribution," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 179-201, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Eleni Karagiannaki, 2017. "The empirical relationship between income poverty and income inequality in rich and middle income countries," CASE Papers /206, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    2. Stuart Adam & James Browne, 2013. "Do the UK Government’s welfare reforms make work pay," IFS Working Papers W13/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Abigail Mcknight & T. Tsang, 2013. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in the United Kingdom," GINI Country Reports united_kingdom, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    4. Michal Brzezinski, 2015. "Inequality of opportunity in Europe before and after the Great Recession," Working Papers 353, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    5. Manos Matsaganis & Chrysa Leventi, 2014. "Poverty and Inequality during the Great Recession in Greece," Political Studies Review, Political Studies Association, vol. 12(2), pages 209-223, May.
    6. Casey Mulligan, 2015. "Fiscal policies and the prices of labor: a comparison of the U.K. and U.S," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, December.
    7. Figari, Francesco & Paulus, Alari & Sutherland, Holly, 2014. "Microsimulation and policy analysis," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell & Kate Smith, 2016. "Shopping Around: How Households Adjusted Food Spending Over the Great Recession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 247-280, April.
    9. Rastrigina, Olga & Leventi, Chrysa & Sutherland, Holly, 2015. "Nowcasting: estimating developments in the risk of poverty and income distribution in 2013 and 2014," EUROMOD Working Papers EM12/15, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    10. Leventi, Chrysa & Matsaganis, Manos, 2013. "Distributional implications of the crisis in Greece in 2009-2012," EUROMOD Working Papers EM14/13, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    11. Manos Matsaganis & Chrysa Leventi, 2014. "Distributive Effects of the Crisis and Austerity in Seven EU Countries," ImPRovE Working Papers 14/04, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    12. Leventi, Chrysa & Navicke, Jekaterina & Rastrigina, Olga & Sutherland, Holly, 2014. "Nowcasting risk of poverty and income distribution in the EU in 2013," EUROMOD Working Papers EM11/14, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

  2. Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2013. "An assessment of Labour’s record on income inequality and poverty," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 178-202, SPRING.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard Blundell, 2016. "Coase Lecture—Human Capital, Inequality and Tax Reform: Recent Past and Future Prospects," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 201-218, April.
    2. Hills, John, 2013. "Labour's record on cash transfers, poverty, inequality and the lifecycle 1997 - 2010," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58082, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. John Hills, 2013. "Labour's Record on Cash Transfers, Poverty, Inequality and the Lifecycle 1997 - 2010," CASE - Social Policy in a Cold Climate Working Paper 05, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    4. John Hills, 2013. "Labour's Record on Cash Transfers, Poverty, Inequality and the Lifecycle 1997 - 2010," CASE Papers case175, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    5. Paola De Agostini & John Hills & Holly Sutherland, 2015. "Were we really all in it together? The distributional effects of the 2010-2015 UK Coalition government's tax-benefit policy changes: an end-of-term update," CASE - Social Policy in a Cold Climate Working Paper 22, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    6. Robert Joyce, 2015. "Child poverty in Britain: recent trends and future prospects," IFS Working Papers W15/07, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    7. Richard Blundell & Robert Joyce & Agnes Norris Keiller & James P. Ziliak, 2017. "Income inequality and the labour market in Britain and the US," IFS Working Papers W17/25, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    8. Jonathan Cribb & Carl Emmerson, 2017. "Can’t wait to get my pension: ?the effect of raising the female state pension age on income, poverty and deprivation," IFS Working Papers W17/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Hills, John & Cunliffe, Jack & Gambaro, Ludovica & Obolenskaya, Polina, 2013. "Winners and losers in the crisis: the changing anatomy of economic inequality in the UK 2007-2010," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51071, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  3. Lorraine Dearden & Chris Ryan & Luke Sibieta, 2011. "What Determines Private School Choice? A Comparison between the United Kingdom and Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(3), pages 308-320, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Geovanny Castro Aristizabal & Marcela Diaz Rosero & Jairo Tobar Bedoya, 2016. "Causas de las diferencias en desempeño escolar entre los colegios públicos y privados: Colombia en las pruebas SABER11 2014," Working Papers 26, Faculty of Economics and Management, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali.

  4. Chris Ryan & Luke Sibieta, 2011. "A Comparison of Private Schooling in the United Kingdom and Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(3), pages 295-307, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Nikhil Jha, 2014. "Late Start with Extra Schooling: The Effect of School Entry-Age Increase and the Introduction of Preparatory Year," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2010-10-23 2010-10-23 2014-03-30. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (3) 2010-10-23 2010-10-23 2014-03-30. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2010-10-23 2010-10-23. Author is listed

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