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Jeremy Schwartz

Personal Details

First Name:Jeremy
Middle Name:
Last Name:Schwartz
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc849

Affiliation

Sellinger School of Business and Management
Loyola University of Maryland

Baltimore, Maryland (United States)
http://www.loyola.edu/sellinger/
RePEc:edi:sbloyus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jeremy Schwartz, 2014. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-215, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  2. Jeremy Schwartz, 2012. "Unemployment Insurance and the Business Cycle: What Adjustments are Needed?," EcoMod2012 3674, EcoMod.

Articles

  1. Jeremy Schwartz, 2019. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 269-300, April.
  2. John D. Burger & Jeremy S. Schwartz, 2018. "Jobless Recoveries: Stagnation Or Structural Change?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(2), pages 709-723, April.
  3. Fabio Mendez & Jared D. Reber & Jeremy Schwartz, 2016. "A New Approach to the Study of Jobless Recoveries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 573-589, October.
  4. John D. Burger & Jeremy S. Schwartz, 2015. "Productive Recessions And Jobless Recoveries," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(4), pages 636-648, October.
  5. Schwartz, J., 2015. "Optimal unemployment insurance: When search takes effort and money," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-17.
  6. Evans, Lawrance & Schwartz, Jeremy, 2014. "The effect of concentration and regulation on audit fees: An application of panel data techniques," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 130-144.
  7. Jeremy Schwartz, 2013. "Unemployment Insurance and the Business Cycle: What Adjustments are Needed?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 680-702, January.
  8. Jeremy Schwartz, 2013. "Do temporary extensions to unemployment insurance benefits matter? The effects of the US standby extended benefit program," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(9), pages 1167-1183, March.
  9. Jeremy Schwartz, 2012. "Labor market dynamics over the business cycle: evidence from Markov switching models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 271-289, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jeremy Schwartz, 2014. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-215, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan Eeckhout & Ilse Lindenlaub, 2019. "Unemployment Cycles," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 175-234, October.
    2. Hie Joo Ahn & Ling Shao, 2017. "Precautionary On-the-Job Search over the Business Cycle," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-025, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

  2. Jeremy Schwartz, 2012. "Unemployment Insurance and the Business Cycle: What Adjustments are Needed?," EcoMod2012 3674, EcoMod.

    Cited by:

    1. Williamson, Stephen D. & Wang, Cheng, 1999. "Moral Hazard, Optimal Unemployment Insurance, and Experience Rating," Working Papers 99-03, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
    2. Wang, C. & Williamson, S., 1995. "Unemployment Insurance with Moral Hazard in a Dynamic Economy," GSIA Working Papers 1995-13, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
    3. Jeremy Schwartz, 2014. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-215, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

Articles

  1. Jeremy Schwartz, 2019. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 269-300, April. See citations under working paper version above.
  2. John D. Burger & Jeremy S. Schwartz, 2018. "Jobless Recoveries: Stagnation Or Structural Change?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(2), pages 709-723, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2012. "Job Polarization and Jobless Recoveries," NBER Working Papers 18334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Paul Gaggl & Sylvia Kaufmann, 2014. "The Cyclical Component of Labor Market Polarization and Jobless Recoveries in the US," Working Papers 14.03, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    3. Korkut Alp Erturk & Ivan Mendieta-Munoz, 2018. "The changing dynamics of short-run output adjustment," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2018_04, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    4. Petroulakis, Filippos, 2020. "Task content and job losses in the Great Lockdown," GLO Discussion Paper Series 702, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

  3. Fabio Mendez & Jared D. Reber & Jeremy Schwartz, 2016. "A New Approach to the Study of Jobless Recoveries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 573-589, October.

    Cited by:

    1. John D. Burger & Jeremy S. Schwartz, 2018. "Jobless Recoveries: Stagnation Or Structural Change?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(2), pages 709-723, April.
    2. Martha L. Olney & Aaron Pacitti, 2017. "The Rise Of Services, Deindustrialization, And The Length Of Economic Recovery," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1625-1647, October.

  4. John D. Burger & Jeremy S. Schwartz, 2015. "Productive Recessions And Jobless Recoveries," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(4), pages 636-648, October.

    Cited by:

    1. James DeNicco & Christopher A. Laincz, 2018. "Jobless Recovery: A Time Series Look at the United States," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 46(1), pages 3-25, March.
    2. John D. Burger & Jeremy S. Schwartz, 2018. "Jobless Recoveries: Stagnation Or Structural Change?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(2), pages 709-723, April.
    3. Alexandre Ounnas, 2020. "Job Polarization and the Labor Market: A Worker Flow Analysis," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2020010, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    4. Françoise Delmez, 2019. "Jobless recoveries after financial crises (and the key role of the extensive margin of employment)," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2019015, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

  5. Schwartz, J., 2015. "Optimal unemployment insurance: When search takes effort and money," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-17.

    Cited by:

    1. Juliana Mesén Vargas & Bruno Van der Linden, 2018. "Is there always a Trade-off between Insurance and Incentives? The Case of Unemployment with Subsistence Constraints," CESifo Working Paper Series 7044, CESifo.
    2. Williamson, Stephen D. & Wang, Cheng, 1999. "Moral Hazard, Optimal Unemployment Insurance, and Experience Rating," Working Papers 99-03, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
    3. Wang, C. & Williamson, S., 1995. "Unemployment Insurance with Moral Hazard in a Dynamic Economy," GSIA Working Papers 1995-13, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
    4. Juliana MESÉN VARGAS & Bruno VAN DER LINDEN, 2017. "Is there always a trade-off between insurance and incentives? The case of unemployment with subsistence constraints," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2017014, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

  6. Evans, Lawrance & Schwartz, Jeremy, 2014. "The effect of concentration and regulation on audit fees: An application of panel data techniques," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 130-144.

    Cited by:

    1. Jannik Gerwanski & Othar Kordsachia & Patrick Velte, 2019. "Determinants of materiality disclosure quality in integrated reporting: Empirical evidence from an international setting," Business Strategy and the Environment, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 750-770, July.
    2. Qiang Guo & Christopher Koch & Aiyong Zhu, 2017. "Joint audit, audit market structure, and consumer surplus," Review of Accounting Studies, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 1595-1627, December.
    3. Climent-Serrano, Salvador & Bustos-Contell, Elisabeth & Labatut-Serer, Gregorio & Rey-Martí, Andrea, 2018. "Low-cost trends in audit fees and their impact on service quality," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 345-350.
    4. Onur Kemal Tosun & Lemma W. Senbet, 2020. "Does internal board monitoring affect debt maturity?," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 54(1), pages 205-245, January.

  7. Jeremy Schwartz, 2013. "Unemployment Insurance and the Business Cycle: What Adjustments are Needed?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 680-702, January. See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Jeremy Schwartz, 2013. "Do temporary extensions to unemployment insurance benefits matter? The effects of the US standby extended benefit program," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(9), pages 1167-1183, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Helen G. Levy & Robert G. Valletta, 2019. "Medicaid Expansion and the Unemployed," NBER Working Papers 26553, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Simoes, Nadia, 2013. "Subsídio de desemprego: uma revisão da literatura teórica e empírica [Unemployment insurance: a survey]," MPRA Paper 52332, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Jeremy Schwartz, 2014. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-215, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Robert G. Valletta, 2014. "Recent Extensions of U.S. Unemployment Benefits: Search Responses in Alternative Labor Market States," Working Paper Series 2014-13, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    5. Andrew Figura & David Ratner, 2017. "How Large were the Effects of Emergency and Extended Benefits on Unemployment during the Great Recession and its Aftermath?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-068, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Elif S. Filiz, 2017. "The Effect of Unemployment Insurance Generosity on Unemployment Duration and Labor Market Transitions," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(4), pages 369-393, December.

  9. Jeremy Schwartz, 2012. "Labor market dynamics over the business cycle: evidence from Markov switching models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 271-289, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Robert Pater, 2014. "Are there two types of business cycles? a note on crisis detection," "e-Finanse", University of Information Technology and Management, Institute of Financial Research and Analysis, vol. 10(3), pages 1-28, December.
    2. Jianmin Shi, 2020. "Optimal control of multiple Markov switching stochastic system with application to portfolio decision," Papers 2010.16102, arXiv.org.
    3. Marianna Oliskevych & Iryna Lukianenko, 2020. "European unemployment nonlinear dynamics over the business cycles: Markov switching approach," Global Business and Economics Review, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 22(4), pages 375-401.
    4. Kurita, Takamitsu, 2016. "Markov-switching variance models and structural changes underlying Japanese bond yields: An inquiry into non-linear dynamics," The Journal of Economic Asymmetries, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 74-80.
    5. Noel Gaston & Gulasekaran Rajaguru, 2015. "A Markov-switching structural vector autoregressive model of boom and bust in the Australian labour market," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1271-1299, December.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2014-09-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2014-09-08. Author is listed
  3. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2014-09-08. Author is listed

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